Paul, the Apostle's Letter to the Romans (really the world). Peterson's The Message Paraphrase Translation

Paul, the apostle to the nations letter to Rome contains some of the most profound words ever written. Eugene Peterson, in his New Testament Paraphrse brings those ancient words into twenty-first century crispness like few translations have. A careful study of this letter is good for any soul living on this planet. Gary Amirault, founder of Tentmaker Ministries.

Romans 1:1-16:27

I, Paul, am a devoted slave of Jesus Christ on assignment, authorized as an apostle to proclaim God's words and acts. I write this letter to all the Christians in Rome , God's friends.

[2] The sacred writings contain preliminary reports by the prophets [3] on God's Son. His descent from David roots him in history; [4] his unique identity as Son of God was shown by the Spirit when Jesus was raised from the dead, setting him apart as the Messiah, our Master. [5] Through him we received both the generous gift of his life and the urgent task of passing it on to others who receive it by entering into obedient trust in Jesus. [6] You are who you are through this gift and call of Jesus Christ!

[7] And I greet you now with all the generosity of God our Father and our Master Jesus, the Messiah.

[8] I thank God through Jesus for every one of you. That's first. People everywhere keep telling me about your lives of faith, and every time I hear them, I thank him. [9] And God, whom I so love to worship and serve by spreading the good news of his Son—the Message!—knows that every time I think of you [10] in my prayers, which is practically all the time, I ask him to clear the way for me to come and see you. [11] The longer this waiting goes on, the deeper the ache. I so want to be there to deliver God's gift in person and watch you grow stronger right before my eyes! [12] But don't think I'm not expecting to get something out of this, too! You have as much to give me as I do to you.

[13] Please don't misinterpret my failure to visit you, friends. You have no idea how many times I've made plans for Rome . I've been determined to get some personal enjoyment out of God's work among you, as I have in so many other non-Jewish towns and communities. But something has always come up and prevented it. [14] Everyone I meet—it matters little whether they're mannered or rude, smart or simple—deepens my sense of interdependence and obligation. [15] And that's why I can't wait to get to you in Rome , preaching this wonderful good news of God.

[16] It's news I'm most proud to proclaim, this extraordinary Message of God's powerful plan to rescue everyone who trusts him, starting with Jews and then right on to everyone else! [17] God's way of putting people right shows up in the acts of faith, confirming what Scripture has said all along: "The person in right standing before God by trusting him really lives."

[18] But God's angry displeasure erupts as acts of human mistrust and wrongdoing and lying accumulate, as people try to put a shroud over truth. [19] But the basic reality of God is plain enough. Open your eyes and there it is! [20] By taking a long and thoughtful look at what God has created, people have always been able to see what their eyes as such can't see: eternal power, for instance, and the mystery of his divine being. So nobody has a good excuse. [21] What happened was this: People knew God perfectly well, but when they didn't treat him like God, refusing to worship him, they trivialized themselves into silliness and confusion so that there was neither sense nor direction left in their lives. [22] They pretended to know it all, but were illiterate regarding life. [23] They traded the glory of God who holds the whole world in his hands for cheap figurines you can buy at any roadside stand.

[24] So God said, in effect, "If that's what you want, that's what you get." It wasn't long before they were living in a pigpen, smeared with filth, filthy inside and out. [25] And all this because they traded the true God for a fake god, and worshiped the god they made instead of the God who made them—the God we bless, the God who blesses us. Oh, yes!

[26] Worse followed. Refusing to know God, they soon didn't know how to be human either—women didn't know how to be women, men didn't know how to be men. Sexually confused, they abused and defiled one another, women with women, men with men—all lust, no love. And then they paid for it, oh, how they paid for it—emptied of God and love, godless and loveless wretches.

[27] See Translation Note

[28] Since they didn't bother to acknowledge God, God quit bothering them and let them run loose. [29] And then all hell broke loose: rampant evil, grabbing and grasping, vicious backstabbing. They made life hell on earth with their envy, wanton killing, bickering, and cheating. Look at them: mean-spirited, venomous, [30] fork-tongued God-bashers. Bullies, swaggerers, insufferable windbags! They keep inventing new ways of wrecking lives. They ditch their parents when they get in the way. [31] Stupid, slimy, cruel, coldblooded. [32] And it's not as if they don't know better. They know perfectly well they're spitting in God's face. And they don't care—worse, they hand out prizes to those who do the worst things best!

[2:1] Those people are on a dark spiral downward. But if you think that leaves you on the high ground where you can point your finger at others, think again. Every time you criticize someone, you condemn yourself. It takes one to know one. Judgmental criticism of others is a well-known way of escaping detection in your own crimes and misdemeanors. [2] But God isn't so easily diverted. He sees right through all such smoke screens and holds you to what you've done.

[3] You didn't think, did you, that just by pointing your finger at others you would distract God from seeing all your misdoings and from coming down on you hard? [4] Or did you think that because he's such a nice God, he'd let you off the hook? Better think this one through from the beginning. God is kind, but he's not soft. In kindness he takes us firmly by the hand and leads us into a radical life change.

[5] You're not getting by with anything. Every refusal and avoidance of God adds fuel to the fire. The day is coming when it's going to blaze hot and high, God's fiery and righteous judgment. [6] Make no mistake: In the end you get what's coming to you— [7] Real Life for those who work on God's side, [8] but to those who insist on getting their own way and take the path of least resistance, Fire!

[9] If you go against the grain, you get splinters, regardless of which neighborhood you're from, what your parents taught you, what schools you attended.

[10] But if you embrace the way God does things, there are wonderful payoffs, again without regard to where you are from or how you were brought up. Being a Jew won't give you an automatic stamp of approval. God pays no attention to what others say (or what you think) about you. He makes up his own mind.

[11] See Translation Note

[12] If you sin without knowing what you're doing, God takes that into account. But if you sin knowing full well what you're doing, that's a different story entirely. [13] Merely hearing God's law is a waste of your time if you don't do what he commands. Doing, not hearing, is what makes the difference with God.

[14] When outsiders who have never heard of God's law follow it more or less by instinct, they confirm its truth by their obedience. [15] They show that God's law is not something alien, imposed on us from without, but woven into the very fabric of our creation. There is something deep within them that echoes God's yes and no, right and wrong. [16] Their response to God's yes and no will become public knowledge on the day God makes his final decision about every man and woman. The Message from God that I proclaim through Jesus Christ takes into account all these differences.

[17] If you're brought up Jewish, don't assume that you can lean back in the arms of your religion and take it easy, feeling smug because you're an insider to God's revelation, [18] a connoisseur of the best things of God, informed on the latest doctrines!

[19] I have a special word of caution for you who are sure that you have it all together yourselves and, because you know God's revealed Word inside and out, feel qualified to guide others through their blind alleys and dark nights and confused emotions to God.

[20] See Translation Note [21] While you are guiding others, who is going to guide you? I'm quite serious. While preaching "Don't steal!" are you going to rob people blind? Who would suspect you? [22] The same with adultery. The same with idolatry. [23] You can get by with almost anything if you front it with eloquent talk about God and his law. [24] The line from Scripture, "It's because of you Jews that the outsiders are down on God," shows it's an old problem that isn't going to go away.

[25] Circumcision, the surgical ritual that marks you as a Jew, is great if you live in accord with God's law. But if you don't, it's worse than not being circumcised. [26] The reverse is also true: The uncircumcised who keep God's ways are as good as the circumcised— [27] in fact, better. Better to keep God's law uncircumcised than break it circumcised. [28] Don't you see: It's not the cut of a knife that makes a Jew. [29] You become a Jew by who you are. It's the mark of God on your heart, not of a knife on your skin, that makes a Jew. And recognition comes from God, not legalistic critics.

[3:1] So what difference does it make who's a Jew and who isn't, who has been trained in God's ways and who hasn't? [2] As it turns out, it makes a lot of difference—but not the difference so many have assumed.

First, there's the matter of being put in charge of writing down and caring for God's revelation, these Holy Scriptures. [3] So, what if, in the course of doing that, some of those Jews abandoned their post? God didn't abandon them. Do you think their faithlessness cancels out his faithfulness? [4] Not on your life! Depend on it: God keeps his word even when the whole world is lying through its teeth. Scripture says the same:

"Your words stand fast and true;

Rejection doesn't faze you."

[5] But if our wrongdoing only underlines and confirms God's rightdoing, shouldn't we be commended for helping out? Since our bad words don't even make a dent in his good words, isn't it wrong of God to back us to the wall and hold us to our word? These questions come up. [6] The answer to such questions is no, a most emphatic No! How else would things ever get straightened out if God didn't do the straightening?

[7] It's simply perverse to say, "If my lies serve to show off God's truth all the more gloriously, why blame me? I'm doing God a favor." [8] Some people are actually trying to put such words in our mouths, claiming that we go around saying, "The more evil we do, the more good God does, so let's just do it!" That's pure slander, as I'm sure you'll agree.

[9] So where does that put us? Do we Jews get a better break than the others? Not really. Basically, all of us, whether insiders or outsiders, start out in identical conditions, which is to say that we all start out as sinners. [10] Scripture leaves no doubt about it:

"There's nobody living right, not even one,

[11] nobody who knows the score, nobody alert for God.

[12] They've all taken the wrong turn;

they've all wandered down blind alleys.

No one's living right;

I can't find a single one.

[13] Their throats are gaping graves,

their tongues slick as mud slides.

Every word they speak is tinged with poison.

[14] They open their mouths and pollute the air.

[15] They race for the honor of sinner-of-the-year,

[16] litter the land with heartbreak and ruin,

[17] Don't know the first thing about living with others.

[18] They never give God the time of day."

[19] This makes it clear, doesn't it, that whatever is written in these Scriptures is not what God says about others but to us to whom these Scriptures were addressed in the first place! And it's clear enough, isn't it, that we're sinners, every one of us, in the same sinking boat with everybody else? Our involvement with God's revelation doesn't put us right with God. What it does is force us to face our complicity in everyone else's sin.

[20] See Translation Note

[21] But in our time something new has been added. What Moses and the prophets witnessed to all those years has happened. [22] The God-setting-things-right that we read about has become Jesus-setting-things-right for us. And not only for us, but for everyone who believes in him. For there is no difference between us and them in this. [23] Since we've compiled this long and sorry record as sinners (both us and them) and proved that we are utterly incapable of living the glorious lives God wills for us, [24] God did it for us. Out of sheer generosity he put us in right standing with himself. A pure gift. He got us out of the mess we're in and restored us to where he always wanted us to be. And he did it by means of Jesus Christ.

[25] God sacrificed Jesus on the altar of the world to clear that world of sin. Having faith in him sets us in the clear. God decided on this course of action in full view of the public—to set the world in the clear with himself through the sacrifice of Jesus, finally taking care of the sins he had so patiently endured. [26] This is not only clear, but it's now—this is current history! God sets things right. He also makes it possible for us to live in his rightness.

[27] So where does that leave our proud Jewish insider claims and counterclaims? Canceled? Yes, canceled. What we've learned is this: God does not respond to what we do; we respond to what God does. [28] We've finally figured it out. Our lives get in step with God and all others by letting him set the pace, not by proudly or anxiously trying to run the parade.

[29] And where does that leave our proud Jewish claim of having a corner on God? Also canceled. God is the God of outsider non-Jews as well as insider Jews. [30] How could it be otherwise since there is only one God? God sets right all who welcome his action and enter into it, both those who follow our religious system and those who have never heard of our religion.

[31] But by shifting our focus from what we do to what God does, don't we cancel out all our careful keeping of the rules and ways God commanded? Not at all. What happens, in fact, is that by putting that entire way of life in its proper place, we confirm it.

[4:1] So how do we fit what we know of Abraham, our first father in the faith, into this new way of looking at things? [2] If Abraham, by what he did for God, got God to approve him, he could certainly have taken credit for it. But the story we're given is a God-story, not an Abraham-story. [3] What we read in Scripture is, "Abraham entered into what God was doing for him, and that was the turning point. He trusted God to set him right instead of trying to be right on his own."

[4] If you're a hard worker and do a good job, you deserve your pay; we don't call your wages a gift. [5] But if you see that the job is too big for you, that it's something only God can do, and you trust him to do it—you could never do it for yourself no matter how hard and long you worked—well, that trusting-him-to-do-it is what gets you set right with God, by God. Sheer gift.

[6] David confirms this way of looking at it, saying that the one who trusts God to do the putting-everything-right without insisting on having a say in it is one fortunate man:

[7] "Fortunate those whose crimes are carted off,

whose sins are wiped clean from the slate.

[8] Fortunate the person against

whom the Lord does not keep score."

[9] Do you think for a minute that this blessing is only pronounced over those of us who keep our religious ways and are circumcised? Or do you think it possible that the blessing could be given to those who never even heard of our ways, who were never brought up in the disciplines of God? We all agree, don't we, that it was by embracing what God did for him that Abraham was declared fit before God?

[10] Now think: Was that declaration made before or after he was marked by the covenant rite of circumcision? That's right, before he was marked. [11] That means that he underwent circumcision as evidence and confirmation of what God had done long before to bring him into this acceptable standing with himself, an act of God he had embraced with his whole life.

[12] And it means further that Abraham is father of all people who embrace what God does for them while they are still on the "outs" with God, as yet unidentified as God's, in an "uncircumcised" condition. It is precisely these people in this condition who are called "set right by God and with God"! Abraham is also, of course, father of those who have undergone the religious rite of circumcision not just because of the ritual but because they were willing to live in the risky faith-embrace of God's action for them, the way Abraham lived long before he was marked by circumcision.

[13] That famous promise God gave Abraham—that he and his children would possess the earth—was not given because of something Abraham did or would do. It was based on God's decision to put everything together for him, which Abraham then entered when he believed. [14] If those who get what God gives them only get it by doing everything they are told to do and filling out all the right forms properly signed, that eliminates personal trust completely and turns the promise into an ironclad contract! That's not a holy promise; that's a business deal. [15] A contract drawn up by a hard-nosed lawyer and with plenty of fine print only makes sure that you will never be able to collect. But if there is no contract in the first place, simply a promise—and God's promise at that—you can't break it.

[16] This is why the fulfillment of God's promise depends entirely on trusting God and his way, and then simply embracing him and what he does. God's promise arrives as pure gift. That's the only way everyone can be sure to get in on it, those who keep the religious traditions and those who have never heard of them. For Abraham is father of us all. He is not our racial father—that's reading the story backwards. He is our faith father.

[17] We call Abraham "father" not because he got God's attention by living like a saint, but because God made something out of Abraham when he was a nobody. Isn't that what we've always read in Scripture, God saying to Abraham, "I set you up as father of many peoples"? Abraham was first named "father" and then became a father because he dared to trust God to do what only God could do: raise the dead to life, with a word make something out of nothing. [18] When everything was hopeless, Abraham believed anyway, deciding to live not on the basis of what he saw he couldn't do but on what God said he would do. And so he was made father of a multitude of peoples. God himself said to him, "You're going to have a big family, Abraham!"

[19] Abraham didn't focus on his own impotence and say, "It's hopeless. This hundred-year-old body could never father a child." Nor did he survey Sarah's decades of infertility and give up. [20] He didn't tiptoe around God's promise asking cautiously skeptical questions. He plunged into the promise and came up strong, ready for God, [21] sure that God would make good on what he had said. [22] That's why it is said, "Abraham was declared fit before God by trusting God to set him right." [23] But it's not just Abraham; [24] it's also us! The same thing gets said about us when we embrace and believe the One who brought Jesus to life when the conditions were equally hopeless. [25] The sacrificed Jesus made us fit for God, set us right with God.

[5:1] By entering through faith into what God has always wanted to do for us—set us right with him, make us fit for him—we have it all together with God because of our Master Jesus. [2] And that's not all: We throw open our doors to God and discover at the same moment that he has already thrown open his door to us. We find ourselves standing where we always hoped we might stand—out in the wide open spaces of God's grace and glory, standing tall and shouting our praise.

[3] There's more to come: We continue to shout our praise even when we're hemmed in with troubles, because we know how troubles can develop passionate patience in us, [4] and how that patience in turn forges the tempered steel of virtue, keeping us alert for whatever God will do next. [5] In alert expectancy such as this, we're never left feeling shortchanged. Quite the contrary—we can't round up enough containers to hold everything God generously pours into our lives through the Holy Spirit!

[6] Christ arrives right on time to make this happen. He didn't, and doesn't, wait for us to get ready. He presented himself for this sacrificial death when we were far too weak and rebellious to do anything to get ourselves ready. And even if we hadn't been so weak, we wouldn't have known what to do anyway. [7] We can understand someone dying for a person worth dying for, and we can understand how someone good and noble could inspire us to selfless sacrifice. [8] But God put his love on the line for us by offering his Son in sacrificial death while we were of no use whatever to him.

[9] Now that we are set right with God by means of this sacrificial death, the consummate blood sacrifice, there is no longer a question of being at odds with God in any way. [10] If, when we were at our worst, we were put on friendly terms with God by the sacrificial death of his Son, now that we're at our best, just think of how our lives will expand and deepen by means of his resurrection life! [11] Now that we have actually received this amazing friendship with God, we are no longer content to simply say it in plodding prose. We sing and shout our praises to God through Jesus, the Messiah!

[12] You know the story of how Adam landed us in the dilemma we're in—first sin, then death, and no one exempt from either sin or death. That sin disturbed relations with God in everything and everyone, but the extent of the disturbance was not clear until God spelled it out in detail to Moses.

[13] See Translation Note [14] So death, this huge abyss separating us from God, dominated the landscape from Adam to Moses. Even those who didn't sin precisely as Adam did by disobeying a specific command of God still had to experience this termination of life, this separation from God. But Adam, who got us into this, also points ahead to the One who will get us out of it.

[15] Yet the rescuing gift is not exactly parallel to the death-dealing sin. If one man's sin put crowds of people at the dead-end abyss of separation from God, just think what God's gift poured through one man, Jesus Christ, will do! [16] There's no comparison between that death-dealing sin and this generous, life-giving gift. The verdict on that one sin was the death sentence; the verdict on the many sins that followed was this wonderful life sentence. [17] If death got the upper hand through one man's wrongdoing, can you imagine the breathtaking recovery life makes, sovereign life, in those who grasp with both hands this wildly extravagant life-gift, this grand setting-everything-right, that the one man Jesus Christ provides?

[18] Here it is in a nutshell: Just as one person did it wrong and got us in all this trouble with sin and death, another person did it right and got us out of it. But more than just getting us out of trouble, he got us into life! [19] One man said no to God and put many people in the wrong; one man said yes to God and put many in the right.

[20] All that passing laws against sin did was produce more lawbreakers. But sin didn't, and doesn't, have a chance in competition with the aggressive forgiveness we call grace. When it's sin versus grace, grace wins hands down. [21] All sin can do is threaten us with death, and that's the end of it. Grace, because God is putting everything together again through the Messiah, invites us into life—a life that goes on and on and on, world without end.

[6:1] So what do we do? Keep on sinning so God can keep on forgiving? [2] I should hope not! If we've left the country where sin is sovereign, how can we still live in our old house there?

[3] Or didn't you realize we packed up and left there for good? That is what happened in baptism. When we went under the water, we left the old country of sin behind; when we came up out of the water, we entered into the new country of grace—a new life in a new land!

That's what baptism into the life of Jesus means. When we are lowered into the water, it is like the burial of Jesus; when we are raised up out of the water, it is like the resurrection of Jesus. Each of us is raised into a light-filled world by our Father so that we can see where we're going in our new grace-sovereign country.

[4] See Translation Note

[5] See Translation Note

[6] Could it be any clearer? Our old way of life was nailed to the Cross with Christ, a decisive end to that sin-miserable life—no longer at sin's every beck and call!

[7] See Translation Note [8] What we believe is this: If we get included in Christ's sin-conquering death, we also get included in his life-saving resurrection. [9] We know that when Jesus was raised from the dead it was a signal of the end of death-as-the-end. Never again will death have the last word. [10] When Jesus died, he took sin down with him, but alive he brings God down to us. [11] From now on, think of it this way: Sin speaks a dead language that means nothing to you; God speaks your mother tongue, and you hang on every word. You are dead to sin and alive to God. That's what Jesus did.

[12] That means you must not give sin a vote in the way you conduct your lives. Don't give it the time of day. [13] Don't even run little errands that are connected with that old way of life. Throw yourselves wholeheartedly and full-time—remember, you've been raised from the dead!—into God's way of doing things. [14] Sin can't tell you how to live. After all, you're not living under that old tyranny any longer. You're living in the freedom of God.

[15] So, since we're out from under the old tyranny, does that mean we can live any old way we want? Since we're free in the freedom of God, can we do anything that comes to mind? Hardly.

[16] You know well enough from your own experience that there are some acts of so-called freedom that destroy freedom. Offer yourselves to sin, for instance, and it's your last free act. But offer yourselves to the ways of God and the freedom never quits. All your lives you've let sin tell you what to do. But thank God you've started listening to a new master, one whose commands set you free to live openly in his freedom!

[17] See Translation Note

[18] See Translation Note

[19] I'm using this freedom language because it's easy to picture. You can readily recall, can't you, how at one time the more you did just what you felt like doing—not caring about others, not caring about God—the worse your life became and the less freedom you had? And how much different is it now as you live in God's freedom, your lives healed and expansive in holiness?

[20] As long as you did what you felt like doing, ignoring God, you didn't have to bother with right thinking or right living, or right anything for that matter. [21] But do you call that a free life? What did you get out of it? Nothing you're proud of now. Where did it get you? A dead end.

[22] But now that you've found you don't have to listen to sin tell you what to do, and have discovered the delight of listening to God telling you, what a surprise! A whole, healed, put-together life right now, with more and more of life on the way! [23] Work hard for sin your whole life and your pension is death. But God's gift is real life, eternal life, delivered by Jesus, our Master.

[7:1] You shouldn't have any trouble understanding this, friends, for you know all the ins and outs of the law—how it works and how its power touches only the living. [2] For instance, a wife is legally tied to her husband while he lives, but if he dies, she's free. [3] If she lives with another man while her husband is living, she's obviously an adulteress. But if he dies, she is quite free to marry another man in good conscience, with no one's disapproval.

[4] So, my friends, this is something like what has taken place with you. When Christ died he took that entire rule-dominated way of life down with him and left it in the tomb, leaving you free to "marry" a resurrection life and bear "offspring" of faith for God. [5] For as long as we lived that old way of life, doing whatever we felt we could get away with, sin was calling most of the shots as the old law code hemmed us in. And this made us all the more rebellious. In the end, all we had to show for it was miscarriages and stillbirths. [6] But now that we're no longer shackled to that domineering mate of sin, and out from under all those oppressive regulations and fine print, we're free to live a new life in the freedom of God.

[7] But I can hear you say, "If the law code was as bad as all that, it's no better than sin itself." That's certainly not true. The law code had a perfectly legitimate function. Without its clear guidelines for right and wrong, moral behavior would be mostly guesswork. Apart from the succinct, surgical command, "You shall not covet," I could have dressed covetousness up to look like a virtue and ruined my life with it.

[8] Don't you remember how it was? I do, perfectly well. The law code started out as an excellent piece of work. What happened, though, was that sin found a way to pervert the command into a temptation, making a piece of "forbidden fruit" out of it. The law code, instead of being used to guide me, was used to seduce me. Without all the paraphernalia of the law code, sin looked pretty dull and lifeless, [9] and I went along without paying much attention to it. But once sin got its hands on the law code and decked itself out in all that finery, I was fooled, and fell for it.

[10] The very command that was supposed to guide me into life was cleverly used to trip me up, throwing me headlong. So sin was plenty alive, and I was stone dead.

[11] See Translation Note [12] But the law code itself is God's good and common sense, each command sane and holy counsel.

[13] I can already hear your next question: "Does that mean I can't even trust what is good [that is, the law]? Is good just as dangerous as evil?" No again! Sin simply did what sin is so famous for doing: using the good as a cover to tempt me to do what would finally destroy me. By hiding within God's good commandment, sin did far more mischief than it could ever have accomplished on its own.

[14] I can anticipate the response that is coming: "I know that all God's commands are spiritual, but I'm not. Isn't this also your experience?" Yes. I'm full of myself—after all, I've spent a long time in sin's prison. [15] What I don't understand about myself is that I decide one way, but then I act another, doing things I absolutely despise. [16] So if I can't be trusted to figure out what is best for myself and then do it, it becomes obvious that God's command is necessary.

[17] But I need something more! For if I know the law but still can't keep it, and if the power of sin within me keeps sabotaging my best intentions, I obviously need help! [18] I realize that I don't have what it takes. I can will it, but I can't do it. [19] I decide to do good, but I don't really do it; I decide not to do bad, but then I do it anyway. [20] My decisions, such as they are, don't result in actions. Something has gone wrong deep within me and gets the better of me every time.

[21] It happens so regularly that it's predictable. The moment I decide to do good, sin is there to trip me up. [22] I truly delight in God's commands, [23] but it's pretty obvious that not all of me joins in that delight. Parts of me covertly rebel, and just when I least expect it, they take charge.

[24] I've tried everything and nothing helps. I'm at the end of my rope. Is there no one who can do anything for me? Isn't that the real question?

[25] The answer, thank God, is that Jesus Christ can and does. He acted to set things right in this life of contradictions where I want to serve God with all my heart and mind, but am pulled by the influence of sin to do something totally different.

[8:1] With the arrival of Jesus, the Messiah, that fateful dilemma is resolved. Those who enter into Christ's being-here-for-us no longer have to live under a continuous, low-lying black cloud. [2] A new power is in operation. The Spirit of life in Christ, like a strong wind, has magnificently cleared the air, freeing you from a fated lifetime of brutal tyranny at the hands of sin and death.

[3] God went for the jugular when he sent his own Son. He didn't deal with the problem as something remote and unimportant. In his Son, Jesus, he personally took on the human condition, entered the disordered mess of struggling humanity in order to set it right once and for all. The law code, weakened as it always was by fractured human nature, could never have done that.

The law always ended up being used as a band-aid on sin instead of a deep healing of it. And now what the law code asked for but we couldn't deliver is accomplished as we, instead of redoubling our own efforts, simply embrace what the Spirit is doing in us.

[4] See Translation Note

[5] Those who think they can do it on their own end up obsessed with measuring their own moral muscle but never get around to exercising it in real life. Those who trust God's action in them find that God's Spirit is in them—living and breathing God! [6] Obsession with self in these matters is a dead end; attention to God leads us out into the open, into a spacious, free life. [7] Focusing on the self is the opposite of focusing on God. Anyone completely absorbed in self ignores God, ends up thinking more about self than God. That person ignores who God is and what he is doing. [8] And God isn't pleased at being ignored.

[9] But if God himself has taken up residence in your life, you can hardly be thinking more of yourself than of him. Anyone, of course, who has not welcomed this invisible but clearly present God, the Spirit of Christ, won't know what we're talking about. [10] But for you who welcome him, in whom he dwells—even though you still experience all the limitations of sin—you yourself experience life on God's terms. [11] It stands to reason, doesn't it, that if the alive-and-present God who raised Jesus from the dead moves into your life, he'll do the same thing in you that he did in Jesus, bringing you alive to himself? When God lives and breathes in you (and he does, as surely as he did in Jesus), you are delivered from that dead life. With his Spirit living in you, your body will be as alive as Christ's!

[12] So don't you see that we don't owe this old do-it-yourself life one red cent. [13] There's nothing in it for us, nothing at all. The best thing to do is give it a decent burial and get on with your new life.

[14] God's Spirit beckons. There are things to do and places to go!

This resurrection life you received from God is not a timid, grave-tending life. It's adventurously expectant, greeting God with a childlike "What's next, Papa?"

[15] See Translation Note [16] God's Spirit touches our spirits and confirms who we really are. We know who he is, and we know who we are: Father and children. [17] And we know we are going to get what's coming to us—an unbelievable inheritance! We go through exactly what Christ goes through. If we go through the hard times with him, then we're certainly going to go through the good times with him!

[18] That's why I don't think there's any comparison between the present hard times and the coming good times.

[19] The created world itself can hardly wait for what's coming next. Everything in creation is being more or less held back. God reins it in until both creation and all the creatures are ready and can be released at the same moment into the glorious times ahead. Meanwhile, the joyful anticipation deepens.

[20] See Translation Note

[21] See Translation Note

[22] All around us we observe a pregnant creation. The difficult times of pain throughout the world are simply birth pangs. [23] But it's not only around us; it's within us. The Spirit of God is arousing us within. We're also feeling the birth pangs. These sterile and barren bodies of ours are yearning for full deliverance. [24] That is why waiting does not diminish us, any more than waiting diminishes a pregnant mother. We are enlarged in the waiting. We, of course, don't see what is enlarging us. [25] But the longer we wait, the larger we become, and the more joyful our expectancy.

[26] Meanwhile, the moment we get tired in the waiting, God's Spirit is right alongside helping us along. If we don't know how or what to pray, it doesn't matter. He does our praying in and for us, making prayer out of our wordless sighs, our aching groans. [27] He knows us far better than we know ourselves, knows our pregnant condition, and keeps us present before God. [28] That's why we can be so sure that every detail in our lives of love for God is worked into something good.

[29] God knew what he was doing from the very beginning. He decided from the outset to shape the lives of those who love him along the same lines as the life of his Son. The Son stands first in the line of humanity he restored. We see the original and intended shape of our lives there in him. [30] After God made that decision of what his children should be like, he followed it up by calling people by name. After he called them by name, he set them on a solid basis with himself. And then, after getting them established, he stayed with them to the end, gloriously completing what he had begun.

[31] So, what do you think? With God on our side like this, how can we lose? [32] If God didn't hesitate to put everything on the line for us, embracing our condition and exposing himself to the worst by sending his own Son, is there anything else he wouldn't gladly and freely do for us?

[33] And who would dare tangle with God by messing with one of God's chosen? Who would dare even to point a finger? The One who died for us—who was raised to life for us!—is in the presence of God at this very moment sticking up for us.

[34] See Translation Note [35] Do you think anyone is going to be able to drive a wedge between us and Christ's love for us? There is no way! Not trouble, not hard times, not hatred, not hunger, not homelessness, not bullying threats, not backstabbing, not even the worst sins listed in Scripture:

[36] "They kill us in cold blood because they hate you.

We're sitting ducks; they pick us off one by one."

[37] None of this fazes us because Jesus loves us. [38] I'm absolutely convinced that nothing—nothing living or dead, angelic or demonic, today or tomorrow, [39] high or low, thinkable or unthinkable—absolutely nothing can get between us and God's love because of the way that Jesus our Master has embraced us.

[9:1] At the same time, you need to know that I carry with me at all times a huge sorrow. It's an enormous pain deep within me, and I'm never free of it. I'm not exaggerating—Christ and the Holy Spirit are my witnesses.

[2] See Translation Note

[3] It's the Israelites . . . If there were any way I could be cursed by the Messiah so they could be blessed by him, I'd do it in a minute. They're my family. I grew up with them. They had everything going for them—family, glory, covenants, revelation, worship, promises,

[4] See Translation Note [5] to say nothing of being the race that produced the Messiah, the Christ, who is God over everything, always. Oh, yes!

[6] Don't suppose for a moment, though, that God's Word has malfunctioned in some way or other. The problem goes back a long way. From the outset, not all Israelites of the flesh were Israelites of the spirit. [7] It wasn't Abraham's sperm that gave identity here, but God's promise. Remember how it was put: "Your family will be defined by Isaac"? [8] That means that Israelite identity was never racially determined by sexual transmission, but it was God-determined by promise. [9] Remember that promise, "When I come back next year at this time, Sarah will have a son"?

[10] And that's not the only time. To Rebecca, also, a promise was made that took priority over genetics. When she became pregnant by our one-of-a-kind ancestor, Isaac,

[11] and her babies were still innocent in the womb—incapable of good or bad—she received a special assurance from God. What God did in this case made it perfectly plain that his purpose is not a hit-or-miss thing dependent on what we do or don't do, but a sure thing determined by his decision, flowing steadily from his initiative. God told Rebecca, "The firstborn of your twins will take second place."

[12] See Translation Note [13] Later that was turned into a stark epigram: "I loved Jacob; I hated Esau."

[14] Is that grounds for complaining that God is unfair? Not so fast, please. [15] God told Moses, "I'm in charge of mercy. I'm in charge of compassion." [16] Compassion doesn't originate in our bleeding hearts or moral sweat, but in God's mercy. [17] The same point was made when God said to Pharaoh, "I picked you as a bit player in this drama of my salvation power." [18] All we're saying is that God has the first word, initiating the action in which we play our part for good or ill.

[19] Are you going to object, "So how can God blame us for anything since he's in charge of everything? If the big decisions are already made, what say do we have in it?"

[20] Who in the world do you think you are to second-guess God? Do you for one moment suppose any of us knows enough to call God into question? Clay doesn't talk back to the fingers that mold it, saying, "Why did you shape me like this?" [21] Isn't it obvious that a potter has a perfect right to shape one lump of clay into a vase for holding flowers and another into a pot for cooking beans? [22] If God needs one style of pottery especially designed to show his angry displeasure [23] and another style carefully crafted to show his glorious goodness, isn't that all right? [24] Either or both happens to Jews, but it also happens to the other people. [25] Hosea put it well:

"I'll call nobodies and make them somebodies;

I'll call the unloved and make them beloved.

[26] In the place where they yelled out, 'You're nobody!'

they're calling you 'God's living children.' "

[27] Isaiah maintained this same emphasis:

"If each grain of sand on the seashore were numbered

and the sum labeled 'chosen of God,'

They'd be numbers still, not names;

salvation comes by personal selection.

God doesn't count us; he calls us by name.

Arithmetic is not his focus."

[28] See Translation Note

[29] Isaiah had looked ahead and spoken the truth:

"If our powerful God

had not provided us a legacy of living children,

We would have ended up like ghost towns,

like Sodom and Gomorrah ."

[30] How can we sum this up? All those people who didn't seem interested in what God was doing actually embraced what God was doing as he straightened out their lives. [31] And Israel , who seemed so interested in reading and talking about what God was doing, missed it. [32] How could they miss it? Because instead of trusting God, they took over. They were absorbed in what they themselves were doing. They were so absorbed in their "God projects" that they didn't notice God right in front of them, like a huge rock in the middle of the road. And so they stumbled into him and went sprawling. [33] Isaiah (again!) gives us the metaphor for pulling this together:

"Careful! I've put a huge stone on the road

to Mount Zion ,

a stone you can't get around.

But the stone is me! If you're looking for me,

you'll find me on the way, not in the way."

[10:1] Believe me, friends, all I want for Israel is what's best for Israel : salvation, nothing less. I want it with all my heart and pray to God for it all the time. [2] I readily admit that the Jews are impressively energetic regarding God—but they are doing everything exactly backwards. [3] They don't seem to realize that this comprehensive setting-things-right that is salvation is God's business, and a most flourishing business it is. Right across the street they set up their own salvation shops and noisily hawk their wares. After all these years of refusing to really deal with God on his terms, insisting instead on making their own deals, they have nothing to show for it.

[4] The earlier revelation was intended simply to get us ready for the Messiah, who then puts everything right for those who trust him to do it. [5] Moses wrote that anyone who insists on using the law code to live right before God soon discovers it's not so easy—every detail of life regulated by fine print! [6] But trusting God to shape the right living in us is a different story—no precarious climb up to heaven to recruit the Messiah, [7] no dangerous descent into hell to rescue the Messiah. [8] So what exactly was Moses saying?

"The word that saves is right here,

as near as the tongue in your mouth,

as close as the heart in your chest."

It's the word of faith that welcomes God to go to work and set things right for us. This is the core of our preaching. [9] Say the welcoming word to God—"Jesus is my Master"—embracing, body and soul, God's work of doing in us what he did in raising Jesus from the dead. That's it. You're not "doing" anything; you're simply calling out to God, trusting him to do it for you. That's salvation. [10] With your whole being you embrace God setting things right, and then you say it, right out loud: "God has set everything right between him and me!"

[11] Scripture reassures us, "No one who trusts God like this—heart and soul—will ever regret it." [12] It's exactly the same no matter what a person's religious background may be: the same God for all of us, acting the same incredibly generous way to everyone who calls out for help. [13] "Everyone who calls, 'Help, God!' gets help."

[14] But how can people call for help if they don't know who to trust? And how can they know who to trust if they haven't heard of the One who can be trusted? And how can they hear if nobody tells them? [15] And how is anyone going to tell them, unless someone is sent to do it? That's why Scripture exclaims,

"A sight to take your breath away!

Grand processions of people

telling all the good things of God!"

[16] But not everybody is ready for this, ready to see and hear and act. Isaiah asked what we all ask at one time or another: "Does anyone care, God? Is anyone listening and believing a word of it?" [17] The point is, Before you trust, you have to listen. But unless Christ's Word is preached, there's nothing to listen to.

[18] But haven't there been plenty of opportunities for Israel to listen and understand what's going on? Plenty, I'd say.

"Preachers' voices have gone 'round the world,

Their message to earth's seven seas."

[19] So the big question is, Why didn't Israel understand that she had no corner on this message? Moses had it right when he predicted,

"When you see God reach out to those

you consider your inferiors—outsiders!—

you'll become insanely jealous.

When you see God reach out to people

you think are religiously stupid,

you'll throw temper tantrums."

[20] Isaiah dared to speak out these words of God:

"People found and welcomed me

who never so much as looked for me.

And I found and welcomed people

who had never even asked about me."

[21] Then he capped it with a damning indictment:

"Day after day after day,

I beckoned Israel with open arms,

And got nothing for my trouble

but cold shoulders and icy stares."

[11:1] Does this mean, then, that God is so fed up with Israel that he'll have nothing more to do with them? Hardly. Remember that I, the one writing these things, am an Israelite, a descendant of Abraham out of the tribe of Benjamin. You can't get much more Semitic than that! [2] So we're not talking about repudiation. God has been too long involved with Israel , has too much invested, to simply wash his hands of them.

Do you remember that time Elijah was agonizing over this same Israel and cried out in prayer?

[3] "God, they murdered your prophets,

They trashed your altars;

I'm the only one left and now they're after me!"

[4] And do you remember God's answer?

"I still have seven thousand who haven't quit,

Seven thousand who are loyal to the finish."

[5] It's the same today. There's a fiercely loyal minority still—not many, perhaps, but probably more than you think. They're holding on, not because of what they think they're going to get out of it, but because they're convinced of God's grace and purpose in choosing them. If they were only thinking of their own immediate self-interest, they would have left long ago.

[6] See Translation Note

[7] And then what happened? Well, when Israel tried to be right with God on her own, pursuing her own self-interest, she didn't succeed. The chosen ones of God were those who let God pursue his interest in them, and as a result received his stamp of legitimacy. The "self-interest Israel " became thick-skinned toward God. [8] Moses and Isaiah both commented on this:

"Fed up with their quarrelsome, self-centered ways,

God blurred their eyes and dulled their ears,

Shut them in on themselves in a hall of mirrors,

and they're there to this day."

[9] David was upset about the same thing:

"I hope they get sick eating self-serving meals,

break a leg walking their self-serving ways.

[10] I hope they go blind staring in their mirrors,

get ulcers from playing at god."

[11] The next question is, "Are they down for the count? Are they out of this for good?" And the answer is a clear-cut no. Ironically when they walked out, they left the door open and the outsiders walked in. But the next thing you know, the Jews were starting to wonder if perhaps they had walked out on a good thing. [12] Now, if their leaving triggered this worldwide coming of non-Jewish outsiders to God's kingdom, just imagine the effect of their coming back! What a homecoming!

[13] But I don't want to go on about them. It's you, the outsiders, that I'm concerned with now. Because my personal assignment is focused on the so-called outsiders, I make as much of this as I can [14] when I'm among my Israelite kin, the so-called insiders, hoping they'll realize what they're missing and want to get in on what God is doing. [15] If their falling out initiated this worldwide coming together, their recovery is going to set off something even better: mass homecoming! If the first thing the Jews did, even though it was wrong for them, turned out for your good, just think what's going to happen when they get it right!

[16] Behind and underneath all this there is a holy, God-planted, God-tended root. If the primary root of the tree is holy, there's bound to be some holy fruit. [17] Some of the tree's branches were pruned and you wild olive shoots were grafted in. Yet the fact that you are now fed by that rich and holy root [18] gives you no cause to crow over the pruned branches. Remember, you aren't feeding the root; the root is feeding you.

[19] It's certainly possible to say, "Other branches were pruned so that I could be grafted in!" [20] Well and good. But they were pruned because they were deadwood, no longer connected by belief and commitment to the root. The only reason you're on the tree is because your graft "took" when you believed, and because you're connected to that belief-nurturing root. So don't get cocky and strut your branch. Be humbly mindful of the root that keeps you lithe and green.

[21] If God didn't think twice about taking pruning shears to the natural branches, why would he hesitate over you? He wouldn't give it a second thought. [22] Make sure you stay alert to these qualities of gentle kindness and ruthless severity that exist side by side in God—ruthless with the deadwood, gentle with the grafted shoot. But don't presume on this gentleness. The moment you become deadwood, you're out of there.

[23] And don't get to feeling superior to those pruned branches down on the ground. If they don't persist in remaining deadwood, they could very well get grafted back in. God can do that. He can perform miracle grafts. [24] Why, if he could graft you—branches cut from a tree out in the wild—into an orchard tree, he certainly isn't going to have any trouble grafting branches back into the tree they grew from in the first place. Just be glad you're in the tree, and hope for the best for the others.

[25] I want to lay all this out on the table as clearly as I can, friends. This is complicated. It would be easy to misinterpret what's going on and arrogantly assume that you're royalty and they're just rabble, out on their ears for good. But that's not it at all. This hardness on the part of insider Israel toward God is temporary. Its effect is to open things up to all the outsiders so that we end up with a full house. [26] Before it's all over, there will be a complete Israel . As it is written,

"A champion will stride down from the mountain of Zion ;

he'll clean house in Jacob.

[27] And this is my commitment to my people:

removal of their sins."

[28] From your point of view as you hear and embrace the good news of the Message, it looks like the Jews are God's enemies. But looked at from the long-range perspective of God's overall purpose, they remain God's oldest friends. [29] God's gifts and God's call are under full warranty—never canceled, never rescinded.

[30] There was a time not so long ago when you were on the outs with God. But then the Jews slammed the door on him and things opened up for you. [31] Now they are on the outs. But with the door held wide open for you, they have a way back in. [32] In one way or another, God makes sure that we all experience what it means to be outside so that he can personally open the door and welcome us back in.

[33] Have you ever come on anything quite like this extravagant generosity of God, this deep, deep wisdom? It's way over our heads. We'll never figure it out.

[34] "Is there anyone around who can explain God?

Anyone smart enough to tell him what to do?

[35] Anyone who has done him such a huge favor

that God has to ask his advice?"

[36] Everything comes from him;

Everything happens through him;

Everything ends up in him.

Always glory! Always praise!

Yes. Yes. Yes.

[12:1] So here's what I want you to do, God helping you: Take your everyday, ordinary life—your sleeping, eating, going-to-work, and walking-around life—and place it before God as an offering. Embracing what God does for you is the best thing you can do for him. [2] Don't become so well-adjusted to your culture that you fit into it without even thinking. Instead, fix your attention on God. You'll be changed from the inside out. Readily recognize what he wants from you, and quickly respond to it. Unlike the culture around you, always dragging you down to its level of immaturity, God brings the best out of you, develops well-formed maturity in you.

[3] I'm speaking to you out of deep gratitude for all that God has given me, and especially as I have responsibilities in relation to you. Living then, as every one of you does, in pure grace, it's important that you not misinterpret yourselves as people who are bringing this goodness to God. No, God brings it all to you. The only accurate way to understand ourselves is by what God is and by what he does for us, not by what we are and what we do for him.

[4] In this way we are like the various parts of a human body. Each part gets its meaning from the body as a whole, not the other way around. The body we're talking about is Christ's body of chosen people. Each of us finds our meaning and function as a part of his body. But as a chopped-off finger or cut-off toe we wouldn't amount to much, would we? So since we find ourselves fashioned into all these excellently formed and marvelously functioning parts in Christ's body, let's just go ahead and be what we were made to be, without enviously or pridefully comparing ourselves with each other, or trying to be something we aren't.

If you preach, just preach God's Message, nothing else;

[5] See Translation Note

[6] See Translation Note [7] if you help, just help, don't take over; if you teach, stick to your teaching; [8] if you give encouraging guidance, be careful that you don't get bossy; if you're put in charge, don't manipulate; if you're called to give aid to people in distress, keep your eyes open and be quick to respond; if you work with the disadvantaged, don't let yourself get irritated with them or depressed by them. Keep a smile on your face.

[9] Love from the center of who you are; don't fake it. Run for dear life from evil; hold on for dear life to good. [10] Be good friends who love deeply; practice playing second fiddle.

[11] Don't burn out; keep yourselves fueled and aflame. Be alert servants of the Master, [12] cheerfully expectant. Don't quit in hard times; pray all the harder. [13] Help needy Christians; be inventive in hospitality.

[14] Bless your enemies; no cursing under your breath. [15] Laugh with your happy friends when they're happy; share tears when they're down. [16] Get along with each other; don't be stuck-up. Make friends with nobodies; don't be the great somebody.

[17] Don't hit back; discover beauty in everyone. [18] If you've got it in you, get along with everybody. [19] Don't insist on getting even; that's not for you to do. "I'll do the judging," says God. "I'll take care of it."

[20] Our Scriptures tell us that if you see your enemy hungry, go buy that person lunch, or if he's thirsty, get him a drink. Your generosity will surprise him with goodness. [21] Don't let evil get the best of you; get the best of evil by doing good.

[13:1] Be a good citizen. All governments are under God. Insofar as there is peace and order, it's God's order. So live responsibly as a citizen. [2] If you're irresponsible to the state, then you're irresponsible with God, and God will hold you responsible. [3] Duly constituted authorities are only a threat if you're trying to get by with something. Decent citizens should have nothing to fear.

Do you want to be on good terms with the government? Be a responsible citizen and you'll get on just fine, [4] the government working to your advantage. But if you're breaking the rules right and left, watch out. The police aren't there just to be admired in their uniforms. God also has an interest in keeping order, and he uses them to do it. [5] That's why you must live responsibly—not just to avoid punishment but also because it's the right way to live.

[6] That's also why you pay taxes—so that an orderly way of life can be maintained. [7] Fulfill your obligations as a citizen. Pay your taxes, pay your bills, respect your leaders.

[8] Don't run up debts, except for the huge debt of love you owe each other. When you love others, you complete what the law has been after all along. [9] The law code—don't sleep with another person's spouse, don't take someone's life, don't take what isn't yours, don't always be wanting what you don't have, and any other "don't" you can think of—finally adds up to this: Love other people as well as you do yourself. [10] You can't go wrong when you love others. When you add up everything in the law code, the sum total is love.

[11] But make sure that you don't get so absorbed and exhausted in taking care of all your day-by-day obligations that you lose track of the time and doze off, oblivious to God. The night is about over, dawn is about to break. Be up and awake to what God is doing! God is putting the finishing touches on the salvation work he began when we first believed.

[12] See Translation Note [13] We can't afford to waste a minute, must not squander these precious daylight hours in frivolity and indulgence, in sleeping around and dissipation, in bickering and grabbing everything in sight. [14] Get out of bed and get dressed! Don't loiter and linger, waiting until the very last minute. Dress yourselves in Christ, and be up and about!

[14:1] Welcome with open arms fellow believers who don't see things the way you do. And don't jump all over them every time they do or say something you don't agree with—even when it seems that they are strong on opinions but weak in the faith department. Remember, they have their own history to deal with. Treat them gently.

[2] For instance, a person who has been around for a while might well be convinced that he can eat anything on the table, while another, with a different background, might assume all Christians should be vegetarians and eat accordingly. [3] But since both are guests at Christ's table, wouldn't it be terribly rude if they fell to criticizing what the other ate or didn't eat? God, after all, invited them both to the table. [4] Do you have any business crossing people off the guest list or interfering with God's welcome? If there are corrections to be made or manners to be learned, God can handle that without your help.

[5] Or, say, one person thinks that some days should be set aside as holy and another thinks that each day is pretty much like any other. There are good reasons either way. So, each person is free to follow the convictions of conscience.

[6] What's important in all this is that if you keep a holy day, keep it for God's sake; if you eat meat, eat it to the glory of God and thank God for prime rib; if you're a vegetarian, eat vegetables to the glory of God and thank God for broccoli. [7] None of us are permitted to insist on our own way in these matters. [8] It's God we are answerable to—all the way from life to death and everything in between—not each other. [9] That's why Jesus lived and died and then lived again: so that he could be our Master across the entire range of life and death, and free us from the petty tyrannies of each other.

[10] So where does that leave you when you criticize a brother? And where does that leave you when you condescend to a sister? I'd say it leaves you looking pretty silly—or worse. Eventually, we're all going to end up kneeling side by side in the place of judgment, facing God. Your critical and condescending ways aren't going to improve your position there one bit. [11] Read it for yourself in Scripture:

" 'As I live and breathe,' God says,

'every knee will bow before me;

Every tongue will tell the honest truth

that I and only I am God.' "

[12] So tend to your knitting. You've got your hands full just taking care of your own life before God.

[13] Forget about deciding what's right for each other. Here's what you need to be concerned about: that you don't get in the way of someone else, making life more difficult than it already is. [14] I'm convinced—Jesus convinced me!—that everything as it is in itself is holy. We, of course, by the way we treat it or talk about it, can contaminate it.

[15] If you confuse others by making a big issue over what they eat or don't eat, you're no longer a companion with them in love, are you? These, remember, are persons for whom Christ died. Would you risk sending them to hell over an item in their diet? Don't you dare let a piece of God-blessed food become an occasion of soul-poisoning!

[16] See Translation Note

[17] God's kingdom isn't a matter of what you put in your stomach, for goodness' sake. It's what God does with your life as he sets it right, puts it together, and completes it with joy. [18] Your task is to single-mindedly serve Christ. Do that and you'll kill two birds with one stone: pleasing the God above you and proving your worth to the people around you.

[19] So let's agree to use all our energy in getting along with each other. Help others with encouraging words; don't drag them down by finding fault.

[20] You're certainly not going to permit an argument over what is served or not served at supper to wreck God's work among you, are you? I said it before and I'll say it again: All food is good, but it can turn bad if you use it badly, if you use it to trip others up and send them sprawling. When you sit down to a meal, your primary concern should not be to feed your own face but to share the life of Jesus. So be sensitive and courteous to the others who are eating. Don't eat or say or do things that might interfere with the free exchange of love.

[21] See Translation Note

[22] Cultivate your own relationship with God, but don't impose it on others. You're fortunate if your behavior and your belief are coherent. [23] But if you're not sure, if you notice that you are acting in ways inconsistent with what you believe—some days trying to impose your opinions on others, other days just trying to please them—then you know that you're out of line. If the way you live isn't consistent with what you believe, then it's wrong.

[15:1] Those of us who are strong and able in the faith need to step in and lend a hand to those who falter, and not just do what is most convenient for us. Strength is for service, not status. [2] Each one of us needs to look after the good of the people around us, asking ourselves, "How can I help?"

[3] That's exactly what Jesus did. He didn't make it easy for himself by avoiding people's troubles, but waded right in and helped out. "I took on the troubles of the troubled," is the way Scripture puts it. [4] Even if it was written in Scripture long ago, you can be sure it's written for us. God wants the combination of his steady, constant calling and warm, personal counsel in Scripture to come to characterize us, keeping us alert for whatever he will do next. [5] May our dependably steady and warmly personal God develop maturity in you so that you get along with each other as well as Jesus gets along with us all. [6] Then we'll be a choir—not our voices only, but our very lives singing in harmony in a stunning anthem to the God and Father of our Master Jesus!

[7] So reach out and welcome one another to God's glory. Jesus did it; now you do it! [8] Jesus, staying true to God's purposes, reached out in a special way to the Jewish insiders so that the old ancestral promises would come true for them. [9] As a result, the non-Jewish outsiders have been able to experience mercy and to show appreciation to God. Just think of all the Scriptures that will come true in what we do! For instance:

"Then I'll join outsiders in a hymn-sing;

I'll sing to your name!"

[10] And this one:

"Outsiders and insiders, rejoice together!"

[11] And again:

"People of all nations, celebrate God!

All colors and races, give hearty praise!"

[12] And Isaiah's word:

"There's the root of our ancestor Jesse,

breaking through the earth and growing tree tall,

Tall enough for everyone everywhere to see and take hope!"

[13] Oh! May the God of green hope fill you up with joy, fill you up with peace, so that your believing lives, filled with the life-giving energy of the Holy Spirit, will brim over with hope!

[14] Personally, I've been completely satisfied with who you are and what you are doing. You seem to me to be well-motivated and well-instructed, quite capable of guiding and advising one another. [15] So, my dear friends, don't take my rather bold and blunt language as criticism. It's not criticism. I'm simply underlining how very much I need your help in carrying out this highly focused assignment God gave me, [16] this priestly and gospel work of serving the spiritual needs of the non-Jewish outsiders so they can be presented as an acceptable offering to God, made whole and holy by God's Holy Spirit.

[17] Looking back over what has been accomplished and what I have observed, I must say I am most pleased—in the context of Jesus, I'd even say proud, but only in that context. [18] I have no interest in giving you a chatty account of my adventures, only the wondrously powerful and transformingly present words and deeds of Christ in me that triggered a believing response among the outsiders. [19] In such ways I have trailblazed a preaching of the Message of Jesus all the way from Jerusalem far into northwestern Greece . [20] This has all been pioneer work, bringing the Message only into those places where Jesus was not yet known and worshiped. [21] My text has been,

"Those who were never told of him—

they'll see him!

Those who've never heard of him—

they'll get the message!"

[22] And that's why it has taken me so long to finally get around to coming to you. [23] But now that there is no more pioneering work to be done in these parts, and since I have looked forward to seeing you for many years, [24] I'm planning my visit. I'm headed for Spain , and expect to stop off on the way to enjoy a good visit with you, and eventually have you send me off with God's blessing.

[25] First, though, I'm going to Jerusalem to deliver a relief offering to the Christians there. [26] The Greeks—all the way from the Macedonians in the north to the Achaians in the south—decided they wanted to take up a collection for the poor among the believers in Jerusalem . [27] They were happy to do this, but it was also their duty. Seeing that they got in on all the spiritual gifts that flowed out of the Jerusalem community so generously, it is only right that they do what they can to relieve their poverty. [28] As soon as I have done this—personally handed over this "fruit basket"—I'm off to Spain , with a stopover with you in Rome . [29] My hope is that my visit with you is going to be one of Christ's more extravagant blessings.

[30] I have one request, dear friends: Pray for me. Pray strenuously with and for me—to God the Father, through the power of our Master Jesus, through the love of the Spirit— [31] that I will be delivered from the lions' den of unbelievers in Judea . Pray also that my relief offering to the Jerusalem Christians will be accepted in the spirit in which it is given. [32] Then, God willing, I'll be on my way to you with a light and eager heart, looking forward to being refreshed by your company. [33] God's peace be with all of you. Oh, yes!

[16:1] Be sure to welcome our friend Phoebe in the way of the Master, with all the generous hospitality we Christians are famous for. I heartily endorse both her and her work. She's a key representative of the church at Cenchrea. Help her out in whatever she asks. She deserves anything you can do for her. She's helped many a person, including me.

[2] See Translation Note

[3] Say hello to Priscilla and Aquila , who have worked hand in hand with me in serving Jesus. [4] They once put their lives on the line for me. And I'm not the only one grateful to them. All the non-Jewish gatherings of believers also owe them plenty, [5] to say nothing of the church that meets in their house.

Hello to my dear friend Epenetus. He was the very first Christian in the province of Asia .

[6] Hello to Mary. What a worker she has turned out to be!

[7] Hello to my cousins Andronicus and Junias. We once shared a jail cell. They were believers in Christ before I was. Both of them are outstanding leaders.

[8] Hello to Ampliatus, my good friend in the family of God.

[9] Hello to Urbanus, our companion in Christ's work, and my good friend Stachys.

[10] Hello to Apelles, a tried-and-true veteran in following Christ.

Hello to the family of Aristobulus.

[11] Hello to my cousin Herodion.

Hello to those Christians from the family of Narcissus.

[12] Hello to Tryphena and Tryphosa—such diligent women in serving the Master.

Hello to Persis, a dear friend and hard worker in Christ.

[13] Hello to Rufus—a good choice by the Master!—and his mother. She has also been a dear mother to me.

[14] Hello to Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Patrobas, Hermas, and also to all of their families.

[15] Hello to Philologus, Julia, Nereus and his sister, and Olympas—and all the Christians who live with them.

[16] Holy embraces all around! All the churches of Christ send their warmest greetings!

[17] One final word of counsel, friends. Keep a sharp eye out for those who take bits and pieces of the teaching that you learned and then use them to make trouble. Give these people a wide berth. [18] They have no intention of living for our Master Christ. They're only in this for what they can get out of it, and aren't above using pious sweet-talk to dupe unsuspecting innocents.

[19] And so while there has never been any question about your honesty in these matters—I couldn't be more proud of you!—I want you also to be smart, making sure every "good" thing is the real thing. Don't be gullible in regard to smooth-talking evil. Stay alert like this, [20] and before you know it the God of peace will come down on Satan with both feet, stomping him into the dirt. Enjoy the best of Jesus!

[21] And here are some more greetings from our end. Timothy, my partner in this work, Lucius, and my cousins Jason and Sosipater all said to tell you hello.

[22] I, Tertius, who wrote this letter at Paul's dictation, send you my personal greetings.

[23] Gaius, who is host here to both me and the whole church, wants to be remembered to you.

Erastus, the city treasurer, and our good friend Quartus send their greetings.

[24] See Translation Note

[25] All of our praise rises to the One who is strong enough to make you strong, exactly as preached in Jesus Christ, precisely as revealed in the mystery kept secret for so long [26] but now an open book through the prophetic Scriptures. All the nations of the world can now know the truth and be brought into obedient belief, carrying out the orders of God, who got all this started, down to the very last letter.

[27] All our praise is focused through Jesus on this incomparably wise God! Yes!

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