Author Topic: Missing chapter  (Read 844 times)

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Offline WhiteWings

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Missing chapter
« on: July 23, 2008, 12:43:57 AM »
I stumbled upon the text quoted below. So I looked up that verse and noticed that the Greek version has Psalms chapter 9 and 10 merged together. And therfore gets 1 chapter out of sync for the remaining part of Psalms.
Can anybody explain this difference?


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What is the shortest chapter in the Bible?
Answer - Psalms 117

What is the longest chapter in the Bible?
Answer - Psalms 119

Which chapter is in the center of the Bible?
Answer - Psalms 118

Fact: There are 594 chapters before Psalms 118

Fact: There are 594 chapters after Psalms 118

Add these numbers up and you get 1188

What is the center verse in the Bible?
Answer - Psalms 118:8

Does this verse say something significant about God's perfect will for our lives?

The next time someone says they would like to find God's perfect will for their lives and that they want to be in the center of His will, just send them to the center of His Word!

Psalms 118:8 (NKJV) "It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in man."


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According to independent research, the King James Version (KJV) of the Holy Bible contains 1189 chapters; Psalm 117 is the 595th; there are 594 chapters before Psalm 117, and 594 after it. Thus, it is 117, not 118, that is the center chapter of the bible.

The KJV has an even number of verses (31,102) and, thus, does not have a single middle verse. The "middle verses" are Psalm 103:1-2, with 15,550 verses before and after.



Would have been nice.... :newb:
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

martincisneros

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Re: Missing chapter
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2008, 12:37:29 AM »
I have no idea.  Some say that 1st and 2nd Samuel used to be one book.  I think that these are the kinds of minor edits that were spoken of by some of the ancients that later generations turned into "corruptions of the Word" and blew way out of proportion and added their religious lies about for future generations.  In one sense, there have been changes over the millenia, but in another sense the Word's never changed.  This partially answers the riddle without my getting into other things.  I've seen some scholars claim that Isaiah was originally two books and that the Mosaic Law was originally one book instead of five or six (some attribute Job to Moses). 

We have everything that was said.  We just don't have it necessarily in the same packaging as we'd of previously had it.  The divisions of stuff may have been to aid Rabbinical schools in "rightly dividing the Word" while they were teaching.  Stuff that got combined might have been combined to make it easier to preserve during times of intense persecution, or perhaps to relate the whole text to certain religious festivals.

Have you seen what Torah scrolls look like?  They're monstrocities!  Bigger than the ol' "family Bible" KJV that nobody takes to Church but leaves on the coffee table or on the book shelve.  The chapter number and verse number designations are completely unreliable and are only a few hundred years old.  Those were put together simply to be able to say where this or that was at, and not to be the beginning or ending of God's thoughts.  Thanks for pointing out the level of design in the Bible.  BTW: one thing you didn't cite in your stats is that the middle two words in the Bible are "the LORD" :thumbsup:  The book still shows it's divine origins regardless of the nay-sayers.

If upon further research you discover that the two Psalms that got combined were combined fairly recently, perhaps it was a typographical error when people were still dealing in hand written copies or an oops when the really really tedious first printing presses came along and they just left the Psalm combination rather than mess with admiting they'd made a mistake.  Somebody may have wanted a rounded off number of 150 Psalms rather than 151.  Many teachers teach that the five books of Psalms correspond to the five books of the Torah, so maybe that simplified really bringing that out.  Or maybe it was particularly meaningful to have those two Psalms in that way by some of the priests during the dark ages and the tradition stuck.  If I ever wound up being able to have such an influence, I personally tend to stick Psalm 103 and Psalm 104 together as one Psalm in my private reading or if they ever have a baring on something I'm sharing.  I've read 'em so often that it's just obvious to me that they're a little lop-sided without each other to paint the full picture.

martincisneros

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Re: Missing chapter
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2008, 01:09:30 AM »
According to independent research, the King James Version (KJV) of the Holy Bible contains 1189 chapters; Psalm 117 is the 595th; there are 594 chapters before Psalm 117, and 594 after it. Thus, it is 117, not 118, that is the center chapter of the bible.
The KJV has an even number of verses (31,102) and, thus, does not have a single middle verse. The "middle verses" are Psalm 103:1-2, with 15,550 verses before and after.

 
I forgot to mention in my last post that if this happened to be the case, then the middle two words in the Bible would be "His holy." :cloud9:

I think that the former calculation is correct though 'cause I've always heard that the KJV had 31,173 verses.  In either case, it's interesting how something approximating the middle verse wouldn't wind up being some weird law about taking shovels to the battle field to deal with...uh....n/m

The middle verse [in either case] isn't either some sadness on the part of Solomon in Ecclesiastes, something lusty in Song of Solomon, or a dragon passage from either Job or Psalms.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2008, 01:16:27 AM by martincisneros »

martincisneros

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Re: Missing chapter
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2010, 11:19:45 AM »
Found anything more on your opening post since then??

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: Missing chapter
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2010, 11:49:12 AM »
« Last Edit: February 11, 2010, 12:10:56 PM by WhiteWings »
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

martincisneros

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Re: Missing chapter
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2010, 05:09:34 PM »
Hmmm...so the fundamentalists have always been right about an absolutely flawless volume.  First time I've EVER seen WHY, since I was taught to doubt coming into UR circles 11 to 12yrs ago what I'd previously taken for granted.  That's actually the evidence of a flawless volume.  I'm going to need a few, between this and something else the Lord showed me the rest of this morning.

Jerm

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Re: Missing chapter
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2010, 03:53:43 AM »
The Greek OT (The Septuagint) has 151 Psalms so that explains the difference.  And as far as Psalm 118 being the "center" of the Bible, that kind of falls apart when you consider that most Protestant Bibles are missing several books. 

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: Missing chapter
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2010, 10:39:58 AM »
Nah, you said it well.  Our posts just complemented each other/fit together well.   :thumbsup:

I've been trying to find the order of the books to which you allude.  Is it chronological, and do you have a list of that?  Thanks.


Click HERE for a readable version.
The order of the names in small print is what you are looking for (?)

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Annotated to the restored text of jubilees 2:23 is the remark that God made 22 things on the six days of creation. These 22 events paralleled the 22 generations from Adam to Jacob, the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet, and the 22 books of the Holy Scripture.
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The 22 numbering is most interesting and fits in well with the literary and symbolic meaning of "completion" as understood by early Jews. The Book of Jubilees put forth that the number represented the "final" and "complete" creations of God. Adam was the last creation of God (being the 22nd). Jacob, whose name was changed to Israel, was the 22nd generation from Adam; and Jacob was acknowledged as the father of the spiritual nation of God. Also the Hebrew language became the means by which God communicated his divine will to mankind. It had an alphabet of 22 letters. And, finally, when God wished to give his complete Old Testament revelation to humanity, that divine canon was presented in 22 authorized books. The medieval Jewish scholar Sixtus Senensis explained the significance of this matter.
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The Biblical Use of the Acrostic
There is a literary device found in the Old Testament which is both a poetic method for expressing a unified design in biblical composition as well as a technique of arrangement which emphasizes completion and perfection. It is called the acrostic.

The acrostic is a feature in which the first letter of a sentence begins with the first letter of the alphabet; the second sentence begins with the second alphabetic letter; the third sentence with the third letter, etc. In complete Hebrew acrostics, there are always 22 sentences, or multiples of 22, each beginning with the first letter aleph and successively going through the entire alphabet until tau, the last letter, is reached. If all the letters are utilized in a proper and consecutive fashion, then the psychological feeling that this literary device provides is one of accomplishment and fulfillment a feeling of wholeness, flawlessness, and perfect symmetry.

This is one of the reasons the early Hebrews saw that Adam, being the 22nd creation of God, represented God's prime and perfect physical creation, and that Jacob (whose name was changed to Israel) was the 22nd spiritual creation of God. The symbolic significance of the number 22, as found in the Old Testament acrostics, was recognized as emblematic of a perfect state of affairs. Let us now notice some of the biblical acrostics that demonstrate this point.
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Nevertheless, the King James Version, though it does not retain the acrostics in translation, has shown its readers where the acrostic design belongs in Psalm 119.

I think the number 22 can also be used to detect apocryphical books in the OT.
The acrostic should be flawless and the apocryphical book/scroll should be part of the scroll it is supposed to belong to.
(I have no idea how they did it when the scrolls were not complete yet)
But at Jesus times there were only 22 scrolls (and copies of it)
There weren't 22 main scrolls and a little scrolls with  for example Tobit and Enoch.
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: Missing chapter
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2010, 04:04:18 PM »
I've been trying to find the order of the books to which you allude.  Is it chronological, and do you have a list of that?  Thanks.
Study yourself approved James  :laughing7:
The book can now be read online for free.
Click here
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...