Author Topic: image and likeness  (Read 3192 times)

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Offline micah7:9

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image and likeness
« on: September 25, 2012, 02:10:07 AM »

Just forget it.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2012, 05:50:41 AM by micah7:9 »
Mic 7:8  Thou dost not rejoice over me, O mine enemy, When I have fallen, I have risen, When I sit in darkness Jehovah is a light to me.

Offline micah7:9

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2012, 05:49:05 AM »
Okay, not worth a comment. Thanks :dontknow: Question is removed.
Mic 7:8  Thou dost not rejoice over me, O mine enemy, When I have fallen, I have risen, When I sit in darkness Jehovah is a light to me.

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2012, 10:08:59 AM »
I sorta overlooked it while I was asleep.
Sorry  :winkgrin:
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

Offline jabcat

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2012, 10:14:40 AM »
i started looking it up, but didn't get too far before other things came up.  i thought it was an interesting question though.

Offline Molly

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2012, 10:33:37 AM »
You have to give us more than ten minutes, Micah.  We're just not that fast on our feet anymore.  :laughing7:

Offline micah7:9

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2012, 03:17:18 PM »
 :laughhand:
Mic 7:8  Thou dost not rejoice over me, O mine enemy, When I have fallen, I have risen, When I sit in darkness Jehovah is a light to me.

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2012, 04:42:28 PM »
Just guessing: What's the difference between image and likeness?
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

Offline micah7:9

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2012, 04:43:58 PM »
 :laugh: I just ask the question. :dsunny:
Mic 7:8  Thou dost not rejoice over me, O mine enemy, When I have fallen, I have risen, When I sit in darkness Jehovah is a light to me.

Offline sheila

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2012, 05:07:08 PM »
 I looked it up in the dictionary...image can be imitation/one def..likeness can be to have the very nature of..............again..man in corruptible  image

   man in Christ/very nature of God

Offline micah7:9

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2012, 05:39:50 PM »
Well thank you all. My question was not, the meanings of image and likeness, but why the writer in   Gen 1:26  And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness:
Then only.....
Gen.1:27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God
And then in Gen 5:1   God created man, in the likeness of God made he him;

Why the change of words? Like I said probably insignificant.
Mic 7:8  Thou dost not rejoice over me, O mine enemy, When I have fallen, I have risen, When I sit in darkness Jehovah is a light to me.

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2012, 06:50:05 PM »
Not saying it's true in this verse (I truly don't know) but it's said huge portions of the OT rhymes.
Hebrew rhyming is saying the same thing with different words.
Just a few made up examples.

Jesus our sacrifice, Jesus the Lamb.
Jesus the Son of God, the Master of Salvation.

The part before and after the comma is exactly the same.
Long explanation: http://tentmaker.org/forum/lounge/the-four-beatitudes-unlocked/msg136789/#msg136789

So I think there is no change of words at all. It's poetry.
Not just that, it's a lesson in which God tells us: "Please note that imo those things are the same."

Gen.1:27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God
That's a very clear one. Obviouly the image of God is His own because He's God.

So: Own image = image of God = mankind looks like God

And then in Gen 5:1   God created man, in the likeness of God made he him
This verse is almost identical to Gen 1:27. God created man and man is in His image/likeness.

Is image the same as likeness. It can be argued it are parallel verses saying teh exavt same thing.
It can also be argued that image mean personality anf likeness outward appearance.
Note that this is just an example for which I have zero support.


1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2012, 06:51:46 PM »
Image

צלם
tselem
BDB Definition:
1) image
1a) images (of tumours, mice, heathen gods)
1b) image, likeness (of resemblance)
1c) mere, empty, image, semblance (figuratively)
Part of Speech: noun masculine
A Related Word by BDB/Strong's Number: from an unused root meaning to shade
Same Word by TWOT Number: 1923a

1923 צלם (ṣlm). Assumed root of the following.
1923a צֶלֶם (ṣelem) image.
Used sixteen times. The Aramaic is used similarly in Dan 2 and 3. The word basically refers to a representation, a likeness. Five times it is used of man as created in the image of God. Twice it is used of the golden copies of the mice and swellings that afflicted the Philistines (I Sam 6:5, 11 and see 'ōpel). Mostly it refers to an idol.
There are a number of words used for idol (see under gillûl and 'āṣāb). Some, like gillûl, refer to their shape; others, like hebel, (KJV vanity) may be just a derogatory substitute (Deut 32:21; Jer 8:19 NIV). ṣelem refers to the image as a representation of the deity. As such, images were strictly forbidden. Notice, not all sculpture was forbidden (cf. the golden cherubim), only the idols.
Man was made in God's image (ṣelem) and likeness (dĕmût) which is then explained as his having dominion over God's creation as vice-regent. Ps 8:5–8 [H 6-9] is similar citing man's God-given glory, honor and rule. God's image obviously does not consist in man's body which was formed from earthly matter, but in his spiritual, intellectual, moral likeness to God from whom his animating breath came. The emphasis of the prohibition of idols is that they are all material created things. God is non-material, the creator (Deut 4:15–19). This spiritual aspect of man has been damaged by the fall and is daily tarnished by sin. But it was seen in perfection in Christ and will be made perfect in us when salvation is complete (Heb 2:6–15).
Bibliography: Girdlestone, SOT, pp. 303–308; on God's image in man: Buswell, J. O., Systematic Theology of the Christian Religion, vol. I, Zondervan, 1962, pp. 232–238. Miller, J. M. "In the 'Image' and 'Likeness' of God," JBL 91:289–304. THAT, II, pp. 556–62.

ֶצֶלם
ṣelem: A masculine noun meaning an image, a likeness, a statue, a model, a drawing, a shadow. The word means image or likeness; its most celebrated theological and anthropological use was to depict human beings as made in God's own image (Gen 1:26-27; Gen 5:3). People continue to be in His image even after the fall, although the image is marred (Gen 9:6), and still serves as the basis of the prohibition not to kill human beings.
It is used metaphorically to depict persons as shadows, phantoms, or unknowing, senseless, fleeting beings carrying out the motions of life (Psa 39:6 [7]); unless they have hope in God (see Psa 39:7 [8]). In a similar vein, the wicked before the Lord are considered as mere dreams or fantasies (Psa 73:20).
The word is also used in a concrete sense to depict images cut out of or molded from various materials. The word describes the images or idols of foreign or strange gods (2Ki 11:18; Amo 5:26). The people of Israel produced images used as idols from their own jewelry (Eze 7:20; Eze 16:17). Israel was, on its entrance into Canaan, to destroy all the molten images of the heathen (Num 33:52). In Eze 23:14, this word refers to pictures of Babylonians that enticed the people of Israel into apostasy when they saw them (Eze 23:14).
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2012, 06:53:04 PM »
Likeness

דּמוּת
demûth
BDB Definition:
1) likeness, similitude (noun feminine)
2) in the likeness of, like as (adverb)
Part of Speech: see above in Definition
A Related Word by BDB/Strong's Number: from H1819
Same Word by TWOT Number: 437a
437 דָּמָה (dāmâ) I, be like, resemble.
Derivatives
437a דְּמוּת (dĕmût) likeness.
437b דִּמְיֹן (dimyōn) likeness.
This verb appears thirty times in Biblical Hebrew and twice in Biblical Aramaic (Dan 3:25; 7:5). In the Qal stem the verb is used mostly in reference to man and by man. either in the form of a direct statement (Ps 144:4; 102:6 [H 7]; Isa 1:9) or in the form of a rhetorical question (Ezk 31:2,18; cf. v. 8, in connection with the Egyptian Pharaoh). A similarly structured question is found in Isa 46:5 with God expressing his own incomparability. The verb is also an ideal one for the author of the Song of Solomon where the respective lovers search for appropriate figures of speech to convey their depth of love for each other:2:9, 17; 7:8; 8:14; 1:9 (Piel).
In the Piel stem the verb assumes the meaning "to compare, imagine, think, intend." Of special interest here are those references in the latter chapters of Isaiah where the Lord says of himself that there is nothing or nobody to whom he can he compared (Isa 40:18,25; 46:5; cf. Ps 50:21 where God chides the people for attempting to make him in man's image). The corollary of this theme in Isaiah would be something like, "I am the Lord, and besides me there is no savior" (Isa 43:11). The point of these verses in Isaiah is not that God says no one is comparable to him in appearance or being, but that no one is comparable to him in ministry and function.
dĕmût. Likeness. Although this substantive is used only twenty-six times in the ot, it is a very important word. It appears in the theophanic section of Ezekiel (1:5, 10, 13, 16, 22, 26, 28; 10:1, 10:21, 10:22, and quite often in juxtaposition with kĕmarê "like the appearance of." Ezekiel is very careful never to say that he saw God, 'ĕlōhı̂m (as did Isaiah in his prophecy, Isa 6: 1, the object or content of Isaiah's vision is 'ădōnāy), but only that he saw the likeness of God or the likeness of the entourage that surrounds God. In such practice he is comparable to Daniel (Dan 10:16) and John in the Apocalypse (Rev 1:13), and perhaps Heb 7:3 (the introduction of Melchizedek). All of the above references in Ezekiel refer to visual similarities, but Isa 13:4 shows that dĕmût can be used also for audible similarities, and structural similarities in the sense of being a pattern or model (II Kgs 16:10, parallel with tabnı̂t).
Finally we note two important passages in which man is said to be created in "(the image and) likeness of God" (Gen 1:26; 5:1), and one passage where Adam fathered a son, Seth, "in his likeness" (Gen 5:3).
Our purpose here is not to examine per se the doctrine of imago Dei. The studies on this have been legion. Specifically. we shall attempt to ascertain the relationship between ṣelem ("image," q.v.) and dĕmût ("likeness") in Gen. Nowhere else in the or do these two nouns appear in parallelism or in connection with each other. The following suggestions have been made. (1) Roman Catholic theology has maintained that "image" refers to man's structural likeness to God, a natural image. which survived the Fall and "likeness" refers to man's moral image with which he is supernaturally endowed; and it is this likeness that was destroyed in the Fall. (2) The more important word of the two is "image" but to avoid the implication that man is a precise copy of God, albeit in miniature. the less specific and more abstract dĕmût was added. dĕmût then defines and limits the meaning of ṣelem (Humbert, Barr). (3) No distinction is to be sought between these two words. They are totally interchangeable. In Gen 1:26, which is God's resolution to create, both words are used. But in v. 27, the actual act of creation, only ṣelem is used. not dĕmût. The two words are so intertwined that nothing is lost in the meaning by the omission of dĕmût. Also, the LXX translates dĕmût in Gen 5:1 not by the usual homoiosis but by eikon, the Greek counterpart for Hebrew ṣelem in (Schmidt). (4) It is not, ṣelem which is defined and limited by (dĕmût but the other way around. Two things are important here: (a) the similarity between demut and the Hebrew word for "blood" dām; (b) in Mesopotamian tradition the gods in fact created man from divine blood. Genesis then represents a conscious rejection of and polemic against pagan teaching by asserting that,selem specifies the divine similarity to which dĕmût refers, viz., man's corporeal appearance and has nothing to do with the blood that flows in his veins (Miller). (5) The word "likeness" rather than diminishing the word "image" actually amplifies it and specifies its meaning. Man is not just an image but a likeness-image. He is not simply representative but representational. Man is the visible. corporeal representative of the invisible, bodiless God. dĕmût guarantees that man is an adequate and faithful representative of God on earth (Clines).
Bibliography: Ausselin, David Tobin, "The Notion of Dominion in Genesis l–3," CBQ 16:277–94. Barr, J., "The Image of God in the Book of Genesis—A Study of Terminology," BJRL 51:11–126. Clines, D.J.A., "The Image of God in Man," Tyndale Bulletin 19:53–103. Humbert, P., Études sur le récit du paradis et de la chute dans la Genèse, Neuchâtel: Sécretariate de l'Université, 1940. Jenni, E., in THAT, pp. 451–56. Labus-chagne, C. J., The Incomparability of Yahweh in the O.T., Leiden: Brill, 1966. Miller, J. M., "In the 'Image' and 'Likeness' of God," JBL 91:289–304. Piper, J., "The Image of God: An Approach from Biblical and Systematic Theology," 1:15–32 (arguing for the ontological, substantialistic interpretation of the "image of God" doctrine). Schmidt, W. H., Die Schöpfungsgeschteder Priesterschrift, Neukirchen-Vluyn: Neukirchener Verlag, 1964. Wynkoop, M. B., 4 Theology of Love, Beacon Hill Press, 1972, esp. chaps. 6–7 (arguing against the ontological interpretation of the "image of God" doctrine). Buswell, J. O., A Systematic Theology, vol. I, pp. 232–42. Richardson, TWB, p. 226.
ְדּמוּת
demûṯ: A feminine noun meaning likeness. This word is often used to create a simile by comparing two unlike things, such as the wickedness of people and the venom of a snake (Psa 58:4 [5]); the sound of God's gathering warriors and of many people (Isa 13:4); or the angelic messenger and a human being (Dan 10:16). Additionally, this word is used in describing humans being created in the image or likeness of God (Gen 1:26; Gen 5:1); the likeness of Seth to Adam (Gen 5:3); the figures of oxen in the temple (2Ch 4:3); the pattern of the altar (2Ki 16:10). But most often, Ezekiel uses it as he describes his visions by comparing what he saw to something similar on earth (Eze 1:5, Eze 1:16; Eze 10:1).
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2012, 07:04:14 PM »
(Gen 1:26) And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.


How to read that?
Venom is like wickedness of people. Obviously that's symbolic because mankind doesn't even remotely look like a drop of venom. It can be argued mankinds ways kill like venom. So the likeness isn't the appearance but teh effect it has on it's enviorment.

Looking at the defention of Image we find words like empty, shadow, phantom, sensless. Exactly the things God is not.

Maybe it simplt means we are  :2c: replicas of a Rolex  :dunno2:

1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

goodreport

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2012, 07:36:40 PM »
As always, WW, you have shared a great deal of valuable information...  I'm still working on Why did God create man in His own image and likeness??...   I have some thoughts (not even opinions yet!!!) and your last four posts re: image and likeness certainly have given me some more tools.  Thanks!!

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2012, 07:46:42 PM »
 :hihat:
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

Offline CHB

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2012, 08:11:21 PM »
(Gen 1:26) And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.

Maybe it means man was created to resemble/look and eventually to become/act like God?

CHB




Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2012, 08:42:20 PM »
(Gen 1:26) And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.

Maybe it means man was created to resemble/look and eventually to become/act like God?

CHB
Image and likeness don't have such a meaning.
But perhaps the word 'make' does.

Stem -Qal    See [H8851]
Mood -Imperfect    See [H8811]

Qal

Qal is the most frequently used verb pattern. It expresses the
"simple" or "causal" action of the root in the active voice.

Examples:
He sat,  he ate,  he went,  he said,  he rose,  he bought

This form accounts for 66.7% of the verbs parsed.


Imperfect

The imperfect expresses an action,  process or condition which is
incomplete,  and it has a wide range of meaning:

1a) It is used to describe a single (as opposed to a repeated) action
in the past; it differs from the perfect in being more vivid and
pictorial. The perfect expresses the "fact",  the imperfect adds
colour and movement by suggesting the "process" preliminary to its
completion.
He put forth his hand to the door
it came to a halt
I began to hear

1b) A phrase such as "What seekest thou?",  refers not only to the
present,  but assumes that the search has continued for some time.

Why do you weep?
Why refuse to eat?
Why are you distressed?

These relate not so much as to one occasion,  as to a
continued condition.

2) The kind of progression or imperfection and unfinished condition
of the action may consist in its frequent repetition.

2a) In the present:

it is "said" today
a wise son "maketh glad" his father

2b) In the past:

"and so he did"       -  regularly,  year by year
a mist "used to go up"
the fish which "we used to eat"
the manna "came down" -regularly
He "spoke"            -repeatedly

3) The imperfect is used to express the "future",  referring not only
to an action which is about to be accomplished but one which has
not yet begun:

3a) This may be a future from the point of view of the real
present; as:

Now "shalt thou    See what I will do"
"We will burn" thy house

3b) It may be a future from any other point of view assumed; as:
He took his son that "was to reign"
she stayed to    See what "should be done"

4) The usage of 3b may be taken as the transitive to a common use of
the imperfect in which it serves for an expression of those shades
of relation among acts and thoughts for which English prefers the
conditional moods. Such actions are strictly "future" in reference
to the assumed point of relation,  and the simple imperfect
sufficiently expresses them; e.g.

of every tree thou "mayest eat"
"could we know"
He "would" say

5a) The imperfect follows particles expressing "transition",
"purpose",  "result" and so forth as,  "in order that",  "lest"; e.g.

say thou art my sister,  "that it may be well with thee"
let us deal wisely with the nation,  "lest it multiplies"

5b) When however there is a strong feeling of "purpose",  or when it
is meant to be strongly marked,  then of course the moods are
employed; e.g.

raise me up "that I may requite them"
who will entice Ahab "that he may go up"
what shall we do "that the sea may be calm"

The moods are also employed to express that class of
future actions which we express in the "optative"

"may I die"
"may" the LORD "establish" his word
"may" the child "live".

Could mean an ongoing action.

IIRC I discussed teh very same thing with Micah for "you will surely die".
Also looks like an incomplete action.
Micah mailed a Jewish friend who said that's a wrong interpretation.

 :dontknow:
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

goodreport

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #18 on: September 25, 2012, 09:19:28 PM »
Oh my...  WW, you are GOOD!!! well, actually, you're the BEST!!!  You even answer questions before they get posted.  My question?   "What about the word "make"? so again, many thanks   also while you're AWAKE!!!! how do the Greek words translated "image and likeness" line up with the Hebrew words???  Just asking... because Jesus came in the likeness of sinful flesh, but knew no sin...  Jesus is the express image of the invisible God...  It seems there's a difference between being created and being begotten... 

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #19 on: September 25, 2012, 09:31:21 PM »
Mat 3:3 Make
ποιέω
poieō
Thayer Definition:
1) to make
1a) with the names of things made, to produce, construct, form, fashion, etc.
1b) to be the authors of, the cause
1c) to make ready, to prepare
1d) to produce, bear, shoot forth
1e) to acquire, to provide a thing for one's self
1f) to make a thing out of something
1g) to (make, i.e.) render one anything
1g1) to (make, i.e.) constitute or appoint one anything, to appoint or ordain one that
1g2) to (make, i.e.) declare one anything
1h) to put one forth, to lead him out
1i) to make one do something
1i1) cause one to
1j) to be the authors of a thing (to cause, bring about)
2) to do
2a) to act rightly, do well
2a1) to carry out, to execute
2b) to do a thing unto one
2b1) to do to one
2c) with designation of time: to pass, spend
2d) to celebrate, keep
2d1) to make ready, and so at the same time to institute, the celebration of the passover
2e) to perform: to a promise
Part of Speech: verb
A Related Word by Thayer's/Strong's Number: apparently a prolonged form of an obsolete primary
Citing in TDNT: 6:458, 895


It's my opinion Matthew was written in Hebrew and Greek is just a translation.
So I think we should use Hebrew defenitions.
For that I use the LXX. A pre Jesus Rabinnic translation into Greek.
I'll compare that to the Genesis verses.
Gen 5:1 - Make

The above Greek G4160 matches the Hebrew H6213

1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #20 on: September 25, 2012, 09:39:24 PM »
So make in Mat 3:3 means:


‛âśâh
BDB Definition:
1) to do, fashion, accomplish, make
1a) (Qal)
1a1) to do, work, make, produce
1a1a) to do
1a1b) to work
1a1c) to deal (with)
1a1d) to act, act with effect, effect
1a2) to make
1a2a) to make
1a2b) to produce
1a2c) to prepare
1a2d) to make (an offering)
1a2e) to attend to, put in order
1a2f) to observe, celebrate
1a2g) to acquire (property)
1a2h) to appoint, ordain, institute
1a2i) to bring about
1a2j) to use
1a2k) to spend, pass
1b) (Niphal)
1b1) to be done
1b2) to be made
1b3) to be produced
1b4) to be offered
1b5) to be observed
1b6) to be used
1c) (Pual) to be made
2) (Piel) to press, squeeze
Part of Speech: verb
A Related Word by BDB/Strong's Number: a primitive root
Same Word by TWOT Number: 1708, 1709

ָעָשׂה
‛āśāh: A verb meaning to do, to make, to accomplish, to complete. This frequently used Hebrew verb conveys the central notion of performing an activity with a distinct purpose, a moral obligation, or a goal in view (cf. Gen 11:6). Particularly, it was used in conjunction with God's commands (Deu 16:12). It described the process of construction (Gen 13:4; Job 9:9; Pro 8:26); engaging in warfare (Jos 11:18); the yielding of grain (Hos 8:7); observing a religious ceremony (Exo 31:16; Num 9:4); and the completion of something (Ezr 10:3; Isa 46:10). Provocatively, the word appears twice in Ezekiel to imply the intimate action of caressing or fondling the female breast (Eze 23:3, Eze 23:8).
1708 עָשָׂה ('āśâ) do, fashion, accomplish. 
Derivative
1708a מַעֲשֶׂה (ma'ăśeh) deed, work.
The verb 'āśâ has the basic connotation of "do" or "make." It is used in numerous crystallized expressions, always with the same basic idea.
Aside from the numerous occurrences of the meaning "do" or "make" in a general sense, 'āsâ is often used with the sense of ethical obligation. The covenant people were frequently commanded to "do" all that God had commanded (Ex 23:22; Lev 19:37; Deut 6:18, etc.). The numerous contexts in which this concept occurs attest to the importance of an ethical response to God which goes beyond mere mental abstraction and which is translatable into obedience which is evidenced in demonstrable act.
The word is often used in specialized expressions such as "make war" (Gen 14:2), "deal kindly" (Jud 1:24), "show faithfulness" (Gen 32:11), "do folly" (Deut 22:21), "offer sacrifice" (Ex 10:25), "keep the Passover" (Ex 12:48), "execute vengeance" (Jud 11:36), and many more.
When used in the sense of "make," the emphasis is on the fashioning of the object (Gen 8:6; 33:17; Ex 25:10–11,  13, 17, etc.).
The word also connotes the concepts "commit," when used of wrong (Hos 6:9), "to deal with one" (Zech 1:6), and "to follow" in the sense of following advice (II Sam 17:23).
When used of God, the word frequently emphasizes God's acts in the sphere of history. These contexts stress one of the most basic concepts of ot theology, i.e. that God is not only transcendent, but he is also immanent in history, effecting his sovereign purpose. Moses could recall God's great acts in Egypt, reminding the people of all that God "did" (Deut 29:1). That which God has done to the nations is a testimony to God's intervention in history (Josh 23:3). Solomon, in his dedicatory prayer, could beseech God to "act" (I Kgs 8:39). The word 'āśâ is often used of the signs and wonders performed by God in the course of history (Josh 24:17; Ps 98:1; Isa 25:1), demonstrating again the heavy emphasis in the ot on the immanence of God.
The word occurs with great frequency in the Genesis account of creation, which is the first great act of God in history. The significant interchange between the words bārā' "create" and 'āśâ is of great interest. The word bārā' carries the thought of the initiation of the object involved. It always connotes what only God can do and frequently emphasizes the absolute newness of the object created. The word 'āśâ is much broader in scope, connoting primarily the fashioning of the object with little concern for special nuances.
The use of bārā' in the opening statement of the account of creation seems to carry the implication that the physical phenomena came into existence at that time and had no previous existence in the form in which they were created by divine fiat. The use of 'āśâ may simply connote the act of fashioning the objects involved in the whole creative process.
The word 'āśâ is also used elsewhere in Scripture to describe aspects of the creative work of God (Ps 86:9; 95:5; 96:5).
ma'ăseh. Deed, acts, business, workmanship, purpose. The primary meaning of the noun ma'ăśeh is "that which is done or made." It occurs frequently in the basic sense of "work" or "labor" (Gen 5:29; Ex 5:4). The word is used often in contexts denouncing idols as the "work" of men's hands (Ps 115:4; Isa 2:8).
The word has the sense of "deed" and, like its verbal root, uses that concept in both a general sense (Gen 20:9; I Sam 19:4) and an ethical sense. When used in the latter sense, it frequently has a negative connotation (Ex 23:24; Ezr 9:13). It may, however, be used positively (Prov 31:31). The "work" of an individual is the basis for requital on the part of God (Ps 62:12 [H 13]).
The word frequently occurs in the sense of "deed" in contexts dealing with God's activity in the created world (e.g. Ps 118:17). A basic theological concept emerges in this regard in the affirmation that God is kind in all his doings (Ps 145:17). The psalmist affirmed that all God's work is done in faithfulness (Ps 33:4). His deeds are awesome (Ps 66:3) and unparalleled (Ps 86:8).
The works of God include the wonders that God performed on Israel's behalf (Deut 11:3, 7), as well as his great acts as they are revealed in his creation (Ps 107:24). These contexts affirm a concept of God that is fundamental to the ot understanding of God. God's acts are discernible in two areas: the physical universe which testifies to God's power and the sphere of history where the acts of God may be clearly witnessed. A well-defined but severely limited natural theology thus exists in the ot. The concept of God's activity in history is an important aspect of ot theology. The psalmist warned of the dire results of forgetting the works of God (Ps 106:13ff.)
The word ma'ăśeh has great significance in the book of Ecclesiastes. Qoheleth asserts that he has seen all the works which are done under the sun, and he finds them devoid of reality (1:14). The word appears to refer here to the events of the world of history observed by Qoheleth. The same usage obtains in 2:17 and 8:9. In Ecclesiastes, the word is used most frequently of man's work. In 3:22 a theology of contentment emerges, for man is encouraged to enjoy his work.
The word occurs in an ethical sense referring to evil deeds (4:3; 8:14b) and good deeds (8:14a). Because evil deeds are not punished immediately, the wicked are encouraged to do more wickedness (8:11).
The word ma'ăśeh connotes "work" or "workmanship" in numerous contexts (Ex 39:5; Deut 14:29; I Kgs 7:8) and is frequently used of God in this same sense. The heavens are the work of God's fingers (Ps 8:3 [H 4]), and they proclaim his workmanship (Ps 19:1 [H 2]). God's works are a source of gladness (Ps 92:4 [H 5]), and they are proclaimed as great (Ps 92:5 [H 6]; 111:2). The mighty nation of Assyria is only the work of God's hands (Isa 19:25). Man is also the work of God's hand, and this concept forms a basis for Isaiah's plea for mercy (Isa 64:7–8).
The word occurs in a number of technical expressions such as "the work of a baker," i.e. "baked goods" (Gen 40:17) and the work of a perfumer (Ex 30:25).
Bibliography: TDNT, III, pp. 1005–1028; VI, pp. 459–72. THAT, II, pp. 359–69.
T.E.M.
1709 עָשָׂה ('āśâ) II, press, squeeze. Occurs only in the Piel, in Ezk 23:3, 8.
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

goodreport

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2012, 09:49:12 PM »
Thanks WW...  now I must get some more ink so that I can print all this wonderful information.

Have a very pleasant evening and a very restful sleep. 

Offline Lazarus Short

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2012, 05:06:40 AM »
For those steeped in only English-language literature, it sometimes escapes us that the literature of other languages employs other methods than rhyme and meter.  Traditional Finnish poetry of the Kalevala uses vowel harmonization - something quite alien to other western literatures (the Kalevala is one of the oldest bodies of literature on the planet), but it makes a non-beautiful language beautiful in song.  Hebrew uses parallelism a lot, a repetition of an idea with different words.  The Bible, in both Hebrew and Greek, is working on multiple levels, as written by a multi-layered and multi-dimensional God.  We have the levels of:

grammar
meter
rhyme
parallelism
prophecy
deeper meanings of names
symbolism
mathematical coding (ELS codes and the Panin codes, probably others)

It all gets so deep and complex, your eyes glaze over after a while, and your mind can't take it all in.  Obviously, the Bible was written by no merely human intellect.

The above may be a bit off-topic, but I was addressing one of the above posts.  I may have something to add later on image/likeness.

OK, try this: http://superiored.blogspot.com/2011/07/mirror-cannot-reflect-itself-message.html

 
« Last Edit: September 26, 2012, 05:13:57 AM by Lazarus Short »
Socrates taught Plato.  Plato taught Aristotle.  Aristotle tutored the son of Philip of Macedon.  This boy grew up to become Alexander the Great, largely by slaughtering a lot of people.  That's philosophy.

Jesus spoke the Truth.  He blessed the poor.  He healed the sick.  He even raised the dead.  He died on a cross for us, lived again, and came back long enough to tell us to love one another.  That's religion.

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #23 on: September 26, 2012, 09:13:40 AM »
Another thing to consider is that Hebrew is a living language. The meaning of words can (slightly) change.
A word in Genesis may have a (slightly) different meaning than the same one found in Malachi.
So if we find 10 defs for the word Image in a lexicon it doesn't have to mean Moses knew all of them.
Maybe he knew all 10. Maybe just 1 or 4. That's especially important to understand for the OT because it was written over a 1000+ year period. The NT was written in a 40-60 year period.

« Last Edit: September 26, 2012, 09:22:02 PM by WhiteWings »
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

goodreport

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Re: image and likeness
« Reply #24 on: September 26, 2012, 09:01:22 PM »
Another thing to consider is that Hebrew is a living language. The meaning of words can (slightly) change.
A word in Genesis may have a (slightly) different meaning than the same one found in Malachi.
So if we find 10 defs for the word Image in a lexicon it doesn't have to mean Moses knew all of them.
Maybe he knew all 10. Maybe just 1 or 4. That's especially important to understand for the OR because it was written over a 1000+ year period. The NT was written in a 40-60 year period.



Hi WW...  I always learn from your posts.  I've been studying the word "new" as in new man, new moon, new heaven, new wine in NT; the word "new" is also used in the OT... how does the usage of the word "new" in the OT relate to "new" in the NT? 

Also been doing some studying of the word "natural" (1Cor 2:14 and 1 Cor 15:16) ...do you have information about the word "natural" as used in 1 Cor?  thanks