Author Topic: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment  (Read 7626 times)

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Offline claypot

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2011, 03:53:56 AM »
:cloud9: I will......and I wanted to add that what freed me from that was knowing that we were lowered into what had us in bondage because we had to have something to overcome. It says "not willingly"; that means it was not of ourself, the "make-up" of us was itself already predetermined, which means the outcome of our "shortcomings" was also predetermined, BUT so was the grace needed to overcome them, ie. He subjected us with hope.

And it's not, "the devil made me do it" excuse, it's HE lowered us so we could learn and learn to love Him with the same unconditional love He first loved us with. In our finite understanding, we think we only have to love others unconditionally, but we also have to love Him unconditionally, because as David said, "Though He slay me, yet will I love Him." And as Job found out, we must accept whatever He throws at us, understanding that He knows what is best, even when it appears to be "bad". And it's a hard lesson to learn. My  :2c:

Card, how you do it (make old things so new) is beyond me but I'm thanking God for you!

cp
For it is God who works in us to will and to do of His good pleasure.

Offline Nathan

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2011, 07:37:30 PM »
I so see things in a similar fashion as you, Nathan and I see something, through a glass darkly, but I see something that you probably do too but I'd like your input on it. I don't stop at seeing the sheep and goats as representing something within me, I don't stop at all things Scriptural representing aspects of who I and all humans are. I see Jesus as representing the Holy spiritual aspect of my essence.

Do you see this?

2 big questions are doing somthing in me. What is God? What is Jesus?

cp

Long time no see!!  Glad to see you out and about again.  I would say that beings we are images made after the Father that yeah, there are definitely many resemblances between our essence and the Father's nature. 

What is God and what is Jesus . . .and you left one out  .what is the HS.  For me  . . THEY are God, manifesting in Fathership, sonship and the breath of life, God is Christ, Jesus is God, if you've SEEN Jesus, you've seen the Father because they are one . . .the Spirit breathes the essences of God into all of us.  Like an egg, like man himself . . .you can't separate one from the others without affecting the continuity of the whole.

Offline claypot

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #27 on: March 25, 2011, 03:17:36 AM »
I hear ya Nathan and I missed all of you here. Time just gets away from a person.

I don't ask in any disrespectful way at all when I ask the two questions. I am seeing God as all that makes us what we are. Really, what is not God? I'm not going for mystical here or new age verbage. What is not God? What is not made up of something of God? Is there any 'material', spiritual or physical, that is not of God? And if 'of God' is that not God, at least in a limited sense?

Adam is a physical person yet represents so much more. Is Jesus any different in this context? Hmmmmmmm.

I'm just thinking out loud here and hoping for some helpful input.

If I can define God, even in my own limited way, then I can understand my role in His program, even if in some limited way. It is not us and God or me and Hitler or us and them. To me it is God, period. And I am an extension of Him, created for His glory and pleasure.

Got to run.

cp
For it is God who works in us to will and to do of His good pleasure.

Offline Nathan

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #28 on: March 25, 2011, 08:01:54 AM »
Amen to that . . . it falls in line with "the kingdom of heaven is IN YOU . . ."  Emanuel . . .God with us . . .there are so many levels to this that there really isn't just "one" answer.

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #29 on: May 30, 2011, 10:13:36 PM »
Ellicott's Commentary on the Whole Bible
 
Matt. 25:46: Everlasting punishment--life eternal. The two adjectives represent the same Greek word (aionion)
aionios -- it must be admitted (1) that the Greek word which is rendered "eternal" does not, in itself, involve endlessness, but rather, duration, whether through an age or succession of ages, and that it is therefore applied in the N.T. to periods of time that have had both a beginning and an ending (Rom. 16:25), where the Greek is "from aeonian times;" our version giving "since the world began." (Comp. 2 Tim. 1:9; Tit. 1:3)--strictly speaking, therefore, the word, as such, apart from its association with any qualifying substantive, implies a vast undefined duration, rather than one in the full sense of the word "infinite." The Encyclopedia Dictionary of the Bible (Catholic Bible Dictionary), p. 693
 
ETERNITY: The Bible hardly speaks of eternity in the philosophical sense of infinite duration without beginning or end. The Hebrew word
olam, which is used alone (Ps. 61:8; etc.) or with various prepositions (Gn. 3:22; etc.) in contexts where it is traditionally translated as "forever," means in itself no more than "for an indefinitely long period." Thus, me olam does not mean "from eternity" but "of old" (Gn. 6:4, etc.). In the N.T. aion is used as the equivalent of olam. Dr. F.W. Farrar, The Eternal Hope, p. 198
 
That the adjective is applied to some things which are "endless" does not, of course, for one moment prove that the word itself meant "endless," and to introduce this rendering into many passages would be utterly impossible and absurd.
Dr. F.W. Farrar, Mercy and Judgment, p. 378
 
Since
aion meant "age," aionios means, properly, "belonging to an age," or "age-long," and anyone who asserts that it must mean "endless" defends a position which even Augustine practically abandoned twelve centuries ago. Even if aion always meant "eternity," which is not the case in classic or Hellenistic Greek-- aionios could still mean only "belonging to eternity" and not "lasting through it." Hasting's Dictionary of the New Testament, Vol. 1, p. 542, art. Christ and the Gospels
 
There is no word either in the O.T. Hebrew or in the N.T. Greek to express the abstract idea of eternity.
(Vol. III, p. 369) Eternal, everlasting--nonetheless "eternal" is misleading, inasmuch as it has come into the English to connote the idea of "endlessly existing," and thus to be practically a synonym for "everlasting." But this is not an adequate rendering of aionios  which varies in meaning with the variations of the noun aion from which it comes.
The Interpreter's Dictionary of the Bible, Vol. IV, p. 643
 
Time: The O.T. and the N.T. are not acquainted with the conception of eternity as timelessness. The O.T. has not developed a special term for "eternity." The word
aion originally meant "vital force," "life;" then "age," "lifetime." It is, however, also used generally of a (limited or unlimited long space of time. The use of the word aion is determined very much by the O.T. and the LXX. Aion means "long distant uninterrupted time" in the past (Luke 1:10), as well as in the future (John 4:14). Lange's Commentary American Edition, Vol. V, p. 48
 
On Ecclesiastes 1:4. The preacher, in contending with the universalist, or restorationist, would commit an error, and, it may be, suffer a failure in his argument, should he lay the whole stress of it on the etymological or historical significance of the words,
aion, aionios, and attempt to prove that, of themselves, they necessarily carry the meaning of endless duration. Dr. MacKnight
 
I must be so candid as to acknowledge that the use of these terms, "forever," "eternal," "everlasting," shows that they who understand these words in a limited sense when applied to punishment put no forced interpretation upon them.
The Parkhurst Lexicon
 
Olam (aeon) seems to be used much more for an indefinite than for an infinite time.
G. Campbell Morgan, God's Methods With Men, pp. 185-186
 
Let me say to Bible students that we must be very careful how we use the word "eternity." We have fallen into great error in our constant usage of that word. There is no word in the whole Book of God corresponding with our "eternal," which as commonly used among us, means absolutely without end.
The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge, Vol. XII, p. 96
 
Under the instruction of those great teachers, many other theologians believed in universal salvation; and indeed the whole Eastern Church until after 500 A.D. was inclined to it. Doederlein says that "In proportion as any man was eminent in learning in Christian antiquity, the more did he cherish and defend the hope of the termination of future torments." Many more church historians could be quoted with similar observations.
Philippson, Israel Religionslehre (11:255)
 
The Rabbi teach no eternity of hell torments; even the greatest sinners were punished for generations.
Dr. Alford Plumer, An Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew, pp. 351-352
 
It is often pointed out that "eternal"
(aionios) in "eternal punishment" must have the same meaning as in "eternal life." No doubt, but that does not give us the right to say that "eternal" in both cases means "endless." Dr. Edward Plumptre (Eschatologist)
 
I fail to find, as is used by the Greek Fathers, any instance in which the idea of time duration is unlimited.
The Pulpit Commentary, Vol. 15, p. 485
 
It is possible that "aeonian" may denote merely indefinite duration without the connotation of never ending.
G. T. Stevenson, Time and Eternity
 
(Page 63) Since, as we have seen, the noun
aion refers to a period of time, it appears very improbable that the derived adjective aionios would indicate infinite duration, nor have we found any evidence in Greek writing to show that such a concept was expressed by this term.
(Page 72) In 1 Cor. 15:22-29 the inspired apostle to the Gentiles transports his readers' thoughts far into the future, beyond the furthest point envisaged elsewhere in holy writ. After outlining the triumph of the Son of God in bringing all creation under His benign control, Paul sets forth the consummation of the divine plan of the ages in four simple, yet infinitely profound words, "God all in all." This is our God, purposeful, wise, loving, and almighty, His Son our Lord a triumphant Savior, Who destroys His enemies by making them friends. Jeremy Taylor, author of Systematic Hellology, which advocates the common belief in eternal torment, later writes a modified view in Jeremy Taylor's Works, Vol. III, p. 43.
 
Though the fire is everlasting, not all that enters it is everlasting . . . . "The word everlasting signifies only to the end of its period.
Dr. Nigel Turner, Christian Words, p. 457
 
All the way through, it is never feasible to understand
aionios as everlasting. Dr. (Prof.) Marvin Vincent, Word Studies of the New Testament, Vol. IV
 
(Page 59) The adjective
aionios in like manner carries the idea of time. Neither the noun nor the adjective in themselves carries the sense of "endless" or "everlasting." aionios means enduring through or pertaining to a period of time. Out of the 150 instances in the LXX (Septuagint), four-fifths imply limited duration.
(Page 291, about 2 Tim. 1:9) "Before the world began" (pro chronon aionion) Lit. Before eternal times. If it is insisted that aionion means everlasting, this statement is absurd. It is impossible that anything should take place before everlasting times. Charles H. Welch, editor of The Berean Expositor, wrote in An Alphabetical Analysis, Vol. I
 
(Page 52) What we have to learn is that the Bible does not speak of eternity. It is not written to tell us of eternity. Such a consideration is entirely outside the scope of revelation.
(Page 279) Eternity is not a Biblical theme.
Dr. R.F. Weymouth, The New Testament in Modern Speech, p. 657
 
Eternal: Greek: "aeonion," i.e., "of the ages." Etymologically this adjective, like others similarly formed, does not signify "during," but "belonging to" the aeons or ages.
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...

Offline Jeremias

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2012, 07:56:26 AM »
I found this explanation of Matthew 25:46:  http://www.tentmaker.org/books/proof_texts_on_endless_punishment.html#everlasting_punishment

Click on everlasting punishment.

It is written in a book called "Proof Texts of Endless Punishment, Examined and Explained." 

It was published in 1862 and written by D.P. Livermore.

I'm wondering if some of you might look it over and comment on the author's explanation.  I'm curious if it still stands the "test of time" in the view of those who are more researched that I am on the subject.  I thought it was quite good.  How would you anticipate an ECT person to counter-argue?

Here is a little excerpt:

Quote
First, The different classes of individuals referred to in the text, are acquitted and condemned on account of their Works, and therefore the subject cannot refer to the immortal world; for heaven is not to be attained by good works! Eternal life is the pure, free and unpurchased gift of God, and is not of works of righteousness that we have done, lest any man should boast!

The second important consideration to which we invite the reader's attention, is, that the original word kolasis, supposed to teach the doctrine of endless punishment, was frequently applied, as lexicographers inform us, to the pruning of trees. In this sense, its application here is full of significance. It shows at once the important object of punishment, viz.: to improve and benefit man. For what purpose are trees pruned? Not to injure them, certainly; but to improve them. Such being clearly the object of punishment, under the government of an all-wise and benevolent God, hence this term kolasis was appropriately employed in the text.

Lexicographers define kolasis thus: "Punishment, chastisement, correction, the pruning of trees." This "everlasting punishment" (aionios kolasis) is designed for some wise and benevolent purpose, not absolutely to injure, but ultimately to benefit and improve those chastened.

Again: The word rendered everlasting (aionios) is not the same word as is translated endless, and therefore the doctrine of endless punishment is not taught in the passage, under consideration. The word endless, from akatalutos, occurs but once in the Bible, Heb. 7:16. "After the power of an endless life."

Offline battle axe

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2013, 08:03:03 AM »
HI all just joined today so im throwing myself in at the deep end really  :eek:

Having pretty much read all the posts im worried if I take on all the inward implications literaully I will become self obsessed.  The nations are the nations arent they?  When I read a post guessing the nations as been in Abrahamn or something aren't we pushing it a bit far?  I do think there are outward literaul things in scripture also surely?   Is the sun the sun?  Is the stars something within us too?  Could there be a trip up if we saw all things as inner metaphors?  Or a type of this or that?  We could go on & on but I rejoice knowing that not only is the inward things what matter but also things outside of me making an impression on me.  I can find much joy in taking in Gods nature & creation,  In doing unto him by helping the poor & needy, Its a mysterious thing but as he feeds us as the bread of life  the living word to us,  he longs to see us stretch out our hand wide to the needy, which comes as if wearing a mask & Jesus is behind the need in human suffering waiting for his servants who claim to love him fufilling the ultimae love in return to our daily bread.   These are healthy outward things looking out of ourself to others needs,  I see these as God's genius ways of freeing mankind from himself all at the same time, almost like killing 2 birds with one stone?  I prefer to think of such many outward things this way & it feels right in my heart too,  I think its silly to take everything as a metaphor?  When are we allowed to accept something at face value?   

Turning everything into spiritual metaphors pointing to the inward meanings makes me look inwardly in over excess when I need to be looking OUT of me afterall I am so corrupt contrary to the spirit naturally nothing is a better medicine just accepting the water gets here somewhere but I completley dont know how? Simple stupid & let the waters flow out of me

Hope I made some sense on just a general tendancy nothing more?  Hope was worth throwing in the mixer  :dontknow:
If you think you are wise, ask God to make you foolish

2 men look through the same bar, one see's mud the other see's the stars (Oscar wilde)

Offline lomarah

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2013, 06:07:22 PM »
Hey battle. :)

I have found that it's both, in my experience. The clincher is waiting on God to reveal these things to me rather than making them up in my own brain (which is never smart and always wrong lol). The more I see the more I truly believe that everything in the law is an example for us for what happens in spirit. (Types and shadows.) The scriptures (and even every aspect of our lives) has been so meticulously planned that it completely blows my mind. He's amazing!!
From Him and through Him and to Him are all things.

Offline ed

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #33 on: January 18, 2014, 05:30:58 PM »
Sheep and goats.   

It is always going to come up when trying to prove ET, annihilation, and UR.

It seems that the sheep are quite pround of their sheepliness.

From the perspective of trying to prove your sectarian bend, how do you know you are not a goat?  We all fall short of actually "doing this unto the least of these".

In the end we serve up doctrine.  In the end what we give is the message of Christ.  Of the three sectarian interpretations, the one that makes most sense, is the one that we all goatishly go with.

Sheep and goats.  Anyone have a good online article for the UR interpretation.

Thanks,
Ed


Offline sheila

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #34 on: January 18, 2014, 08:48:03 PM »
 not an online article..but a personal 'beleif'........the sheep are all men....white..because of God's

 will/plan/Christ positive.  the goats are black..satans angels/demons.-negative.

  if a sheep overcome[the saints overcome] becomes a 'black' sheep=exhibits negative

 black characteristics/image of corrupt.

   Christ/light/white/sacred...man in God's image.........

   Jesus Christ has power and authority to change a black sheep unto a white sheep in

 this life..remove darkness..have sheep exhibit positive characteristics of light.

   some sheep serve as examples of light and some dark for learning of all[good/evil exercize.

    at end of exercize[all black sheep turned into white[prodigal's return home] exercize over

   all sheep with the shepherd..all sheep white....negative/black/goatimage no longer needed

 or used as teaching tool.

    transition of a black sheep to a white sheep.........if some darkness remain while in this life

 is a spotted sheep[spots and blemishes remain]

   sheep...man      goat-demon [Lev 17;7 Isaaih13;21  Lev 16;22]

   see Jacob/Israel and Laban dispute of flocks.......wages changed 10 times..Christ blood

redeemed all mankind..though your sins be as scarlet..yet they shall be white as snow....

see red cloth turn white..goat sent off to perish in wilderness and never enter the city.


     goats can survive and forage on briars thorns etc[cursed is the ground on account of you

 it shall bring up thorns and thistle's for you] sheep become entrapped of them and need

 grass/pasture[all flesh is grass=man=sheep] I will take away the stoney heart and give you

a heart of flesh

   all men are sheep...even the 'black sheep' of the family/prodigals...sheep can also be

lost sheep..and be found of their shepherd.  All shall pass under the rod of the Shepherd.

   Ezekiel 20;34   -44   I will take note of you as you pass under the rod..and I will bring

you into the bond of the covenant...I will purge you of those who revolt and rebel against me

[goats seperated=goat-shaped demons perish in wilderness..seperate the people=

 sheep have 'black/negative' contrast removed from them[delivered from the wicked one]

[resurrection of righteous/wicked

 wickedness removed...although I will bring them out of the land they were living[resurrection

   of the wicked] yet they will not enter the land of Israel[see resurrection/insurrection]

    thus that wicked generation[black goat shaped demons] shall perish in the wilderness

 and not enter the Holy city/ dark evil contrast removed..cloth turns scarlet/white

   


   there are wolves in sheep clothing..and sheep in wolves clothing.........


     SOS..the goat shepherdess.........she's dark...and is instructed by Him to graze her

 young 'goats' by the tents of the shepherds....He must remove her 'darkness'

seperate her from and deliver her from the wicked one.........why would you look upon

the shulamite as upon the dance f Mahanaim[two camps/camp of God/camp of the Holy city]

  kingdom of darkness/kingdom of light

  Come! take life's waters free! outside..are the darkness..enter in the sheepgate

that the Shepherd has opened and no-one can close.

      .

Offline Cardinal

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #35 on: April 07, 2014, 04:32:20 PM »
 :cloud9: An older thread but well worth a re-read.

Loved your last post, Sheila.....Blessings....

PS. And there are some sheep who just appear to be black (taking on image of sinful flesh), but in reality, they are performing the Father's perfect will.  :winkgrin:
« Last Edit: April 07, 2014, 06:13:53 PM by Cardinal »
"I would rather train twenty men to pray, than a thousand to preach; A minister's highest mission ought to be to teach his people to pray." -H. MacGregor

Offline sheila

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #36 on: April 07, 2014, 05:10:09 PM »
oh yes...just as He took on the appearance of sin..........

Offline sheila

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #37 on: April 07, 2014, 06:07:30 PM »
you know,He counsels us to be 'cautious as serpents,yet innocent as doves" and says the children of light are not as

  wise in this respect as the children of the world.   the snake lifted up on the pole........

   when someone come in with a new revelation[word of knowledge] caution is warranted due to being mistaken as a serpent

 and having your head crushed under the foot of some well meaning brother. Just as the early christians and Christ

 were killed and those thinking they were doing God a service.......perceived as a wolf in sheep clothing;of which Paul

 typified...first the wolf to the christians..then he appeared as a wlf to the Pharisees.


  of course we have examples of those 'without the spirit/receiving  and tthe baptism of the Holy spirit..that were yet to

 receive.....  and even examples of those preaching...'not according to accurate knowledge"  and how that was dealt with.


         Jesus Christ 'died' at just the right time..when people were still in sin/error..........a friend of sinners..He chose

  thedespised things.  If His spirit be in us...surely it,too, would lay down it's life........I have many things yet to declare unto you

  but at present ye are unable to bear them   He doesn't 'force feed' but He does speak of things that many stumbled over

   He doesn't extinguish a sputtering wick. He ministers to it..that it may shine more brightly..adds oil..trims the wick....

   He provides more abundant oil...He doesn't place it under a basket.

   we,like the angels..are fellow ministers to those who are going to inherit eternal life[all men]

      How is it that when you come togather some have a revelation some a Psalm......

           Knowledge will increase[Daniel]   there be spiritual gems and treasures to be discovered in the 'word of God'

                hidden things[the glory of kings to seek ut a matter] brought into the spiritual city
       

Offline Cardinal

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #38 on: April 07, 2014, 06:15:28 PM »
 :cloud9: Amen  :thumbsup:
"I would rather train twenty men to pray, than a thousand to preach; A minister's highest mission ought to be to teach his people to pray." -H. MacGregor

Offline Graph1159

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #39 on: April 08, 2014, 01:55:22 AM »
I think it's quite possible that when the words of Matthew 25:46 were spoken, the immediate audience pictured eternity. My understanding is that Jews of the Old Testament believed that the Messiah would come and establish an eternal Kingdom on earth. Even though the word "olam" is usually used in the Old Testament where the English translations have "forever" or "eternal," nothing beyond this earthly Kingdom is ever spoken of in the Old Testament, so naturally, Jews would concluded that the Messiah's coming should commence an eternal age on earth. While Christians speak of being resurrected to spent eternity in Heaven, the Old Testament Jews' expectation was to be resurrected to live eternally in a kingdom on earth.

Daniel wrote of some being resurrected to "everlasting life" and others to "everlasting contempt" (12:2). Regardless of what the underlying words are in the original language, it's a real stretch to say the immediate audience would envision a limited age. In a similar way, Jesus taught that there was a limited amount of time to qualify for entrance into the Kingdom which He would return to establish. Neither the Old Testament nor the Gospels suggest that if you are disqualified for the Kingdom, you will be reconsidered at a later date. And given the perception among Jews that the earthly Kingdom was eternal, the "aionian punishment" of Matthew 25 probably was understood as eternal punishment.

As New Testament revelation progressed, more phases in God's plan of the ages were revealed. In Revelation, it was revealed that the Messianic Kingdom on this present earth has a duration of 1000 years. Paul gives the previously unheard-of revelation that even the reign of Christ is not eternal, but that He will reign until all are subject to Him then subject Himself to God at the Consummation that God may be All in all (1 Corinthians 15:22-28). This is not revealed in the Old Testament, the Four Gospels, or the Book of Revelation. Revelation ends with the saints still reigning.

So, in light of later revelation, we can look back at Matthew 25:46 and say that the aionion punishment refers to a finite age, although it's true that the immediate context does not back this interpretation.

Offline WhiteWings

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Re: Matthew 25:31-46 Sheep, Goats, Everlasting Punishment
« Reply #40 on: April 08, 2014, 07:47:22 AM »
My understanding is that Jews of the Old Testament believed that the Messiah would come and establish an eternal Kingdom on earth.
......
Daniel wrote of some being resurrected to "everlasting life" and others to "everlasting contempt" (12:2). Regardless of what the underlying words are in the original language,  it's a real stretch to say the immediate audience would envision a limited age.
I don't think it's a real stretch.
Jonah was in the fish for olam. ==> Olam=3 days
The slave stayed with his master for an olam that ends at death. ==> Olam=years
That clearly shows every ancient Jew understood olam as something with variable duration.
Quote
In a similar way, Jesus taught that there was a limited amount of time to qualify for entrance into the Kingdom which He would return to establish. Neither the Old Testament nor the Gospels suggest that if you are disqualified for the Kingdom, you will be reconsidered at a later date.
In the OT we see that God rejects His people, puts them under some punishment and then takes them back. He even divorces them, but still He sends His Son to exactly that nation.
In Revelation we see people entering the kingdom at different times. The people who get resurrected 1st enter 1000 years before the next group.
Also in Revelation we read that New Jerusalem descents to earth. Obviously that happens when/after the Kingdom is established. The gates never shut and all bad people (thieves, murderers, etc) can't enter. I would say that's way past the limited time period to enter. But it isn't....
Even then people are offered to drink from the water of life. The people inside that city did so long ago and already have everlasting life.
There is a tree for the healing of  nations. Everything inside the city is of perfect health. The offer is extended to the nations living outside the gates of New Jerusalem. A bit later we see kings entering the city. Those kings bring their people. Not for war but to submit/bring honor to TheKing.

The Greek word for punishment actually means correction. Correction always was of limited duration. Jesus/Apostles always used that word. The audience knew that word. Of course impossible to prove what each member the audience did (not) understand but all teachings used words that point to corrective limited punishment.

Mat 12:20 A bruised reed he will not break, and a smoldering wick he will not snuff out, till he has brought justice through to victory.
Isa 42:3 A bruised reed he will not break, and a smoldering wick he will not snuff out. In faithfulness he will bring forth justice;

Wouldn't unending punishment snuff out the wick?



To summarize:
- I agree the NT added more information to the OT teachings.
- I'm not sure the Jews understood punishment as everlasting.
- All words regarding to punishment used words of limited duration. The word punishment is about something with an end too.
1 Timothy 2:3-4  ...God our Savior;  Who will have all men to be saved...
John 12:47  And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
Romans 4:5 But to the one who does not work, but believes in the one who declares the ungodly righteous ...